Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Ecosystem structure and function are strongly affected by disturbance events, many of which in North America are associated with seasonal temperature extremes, wildfires, and tropical storms. This study was conducted to evaluate patterns in a 19-year...

Person: Potter, Ping-Ning, Kumar, Kucharik, Klooster, Genovese, Cohen, Healey
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Lardner, Wright, Cohen, Curry, MacFarlane
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text... 'Wildand-urban interface (W-UI) fires are a significant concern for federal, state, and local land management and fire agencies. research using modeling experiments, and W-UI case studies indicates that home ignitability during...

Person: Cohen
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Populations of scaled quail (Callipepla squamata) and northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus) have declined in North America coincident with global warming. We speculate on a cause-effect relation between global warming and quail declines. Quail are...

Person: Brennan, Palmer, Burger, Pruden, Guthery, Forrester, Nolte, Cohen, Kuvlesky
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The threat of life and property losses related to wildfires is a significant issue for federal, state, and local fire and planning agencies who consider the mix of residential areas and wildlands. The wildland fire threat is part of the more general...

Person: Cohen
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This publication is designed to help you minimize the risks of losing your home from wildfire. The first step is to understand wildife and how homes are destroyed. Next, consider the fire resistiveness of your house and the surrounding landscape, and...

Person: Barkley, Schnepf, Cohen
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Ecosystem structure and function are strongly affected by disturbance events, many of which in North America are associated with seasonal temperature extremes, wildfires, and tropical storms. This study was conducted to evaluate patterns in a 19-year...

Person: Potter, Ping-Ning, Kumar, Kucharik, Klooster, Genovese, Cohen, Healey
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland-urban interface (W-UI) fires are a significant concern for federal, state, and local land management and fire agencies. Research using modeling, experiments, and W-UI case studies indicates that home ignitability during wildland fires depends...

Person: Cohen
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This study compared aspatial and spatial methods of using remote sensing and field data to predict maximum growing season leaf area index (LAI) maps in a boreal forest in Manitoba, Canada. The methods tested were orthogonal regression analysis (reduced...

Person: Berterretche, Hudak, Cohen, Maiersperger, Gower, Dungan
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A general method of comparing escape route effectiveness in any terrain using any fire prediction method is presented. Information gathered from the South Canyon fire that burned in Western Colorado during July, 1994 and the Mann Gulch Fire that burned...

Person: Butler, Shannon, Butler, Cohen, Putnam, Bartlette, Bradshaw
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES