Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Ecosystem structure and function are strongly affected by disturbance events, many of which in North America are associated with seasonal temperature extremes, wildfires, and tropical storms. This study was conducted to evaluate patterns in a 19-year...

Person: Potter, Ping-Ning, Kumar, Kucharik, Klooster, Genovese, Cohen, Healey
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A paradigm shift from fire suppression to fire suppression and prescription requires a shift in emphasis from simply controlling wildfire occurrence and spread to one that includes controlling characteristics of prescribed fire. Suppression focuses on...

Person: Pruden, Brennan, Paysen, Narog, Cohen
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This publication is designed to help you minimize the risks of losing your home from wildfire. The first step is to understand wildife and how homes are destroyed. Next, consider the fire resistiveness of your house and the surrounding landscape, and...

Person: Barkley, Schnepf, Cohen
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Ecosystem structure and function are strongly affected by disturbance events, many of which in North America are associated with seasonal temperature extremes, wildfires, and tropical storms. This study was conducted to evaluate patterns in a 19-year...

Person: Potter, Ping-Ning, Kumar, Kucharik, Klooster, Genovese, Cohen, Healey
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This study compared aspatial and spatial methods of using remote sensing and field data to predict maximum growing season leaf area index (LAI) maps in a boreal forest in Manitoba, Canada. The methods tested were orthogonal regression analysis (reduced...

Person: Berterretche, Hudak, Cohen, Maiersperger, Gower, Dungan
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Safety zone is a term familiar to wildland firefighters. However, relatively little quantitative information is available regarding necessary safety zone size. This study presents some analytical results from calculations of radiant energy transfer...

Person: Butler, Cohen
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The wildland-urban interface (W-UI) refers to residential areas surrounded by or adjacent to wildland areas. In recent years, significant W-UI residential fire losses have occurred nationwide in the United States that have focused attention on the...

Person: Cohen, Saveland
Year: 1997
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Quantitative information regarding safety zone size for wildland firefighters is limited. We present a 3-surface theoretical model that describes the net radiant energy transfer to a firefighter standing a specified distance from a fire of specified...

Person: Butler, Cohen
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

All wildland firefighters working on or near the fireline must be able to identify a safety zone. Furthermore, they need to know how 'big' is 'big enough.' Beighley (1995) defined a safety zone as 'an area distinguished by...

Person: Butler, Cohen
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES