Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 19

It is well understood that the incidence and behavior of forest fire depends mainly on short-term weather influences of no more than several days duration. And yet, all through the history of fire danger rating in the United States and Canada, runs a...

Person: Alexander
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Powerpoint presentation given at the Joint Session of 19th Annual Interior West Fire Council Conference & 6th American Meteorological Society Symposium on Fire and Forest Meteorology, Oct. 25-27, 2005, Canmore, AB.

Person: Alexander
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

In Canada, the importance of seasonality in forest fire danger rating associated with phenological changes in deciduous tree leaves and lesser ground vegetation has historically been taken into account by dividing the fire season into three distinct...

Person: Alexander
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'The August 2004 issue of the Canadian Journal of forest Research (volume 34[8]) is devoted to a special topic: 'The International Crown Fire Modelling Experiment (ICFME) in Canada's Northwest Territories: Advancing the...

Person: Alexander
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfires are a major natural disturbance in boreal forests of interior Alaska and play an important role in determining forest plant composition and productivity by influencing parameters such as nutrient availability, light transmission, and forest...

Person: Earl, Alexander, Mack
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

You cannot prevent fires. You can only prevent small ones becoming big ones (Taylor 1989). I think what Taylor (1989) meant to say was that 'You cannot necessarily prevent all fires from occurring. You can only possibly prevent some small...

Person: Alexander
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Members of the project team associated with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) project JFSP-09-S-03-1 entitled 'Crown Fire Behavior Characteristics and Prediction in Conifer Forests: A State of Knowledge Synthesis' are actively seeking...

Person: Wade, Alexander, Cruz, Vaillant, Peterson
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The foliar moisture content (FMC) of coniferous trees is estimated within the context of the Canadian Forest Fire Behavior Prediction System on the basis of an empirical method that is limited to the forest regions of Canada and immediately adjacent...

Person: Viegas, Alexander
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Abstract: This document contains the slides for the crown fire portion of the fire behaviour short course presentation, outlined as follows: I. Introduction to Crown Fires; II. Understanding of Crown Fire Behavior From Experimental Fire and Wildfire...

Person: Cruz, Alexander
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Cruz et al. (2003) developed regression equations for estimating canopy base height (CBH), canopy fuel load (CFL) and canopy bulk density (CBD) for use in assessing crown fire potential in four broad coniferous forest fuel types found in western North...

Person: Alexander, Cruz
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES