Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 69

We describe primers and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) conditions to amplify four dinucleotide, one trinucleotide, and three tetranucleotide microsatellite DNA loci from the bobcat (Lynx rufus). The primers were tested on 22 individuals collected from...

Person: Faircloth, Reid, Valentine, Eo, Terhune, Glenn, Palmer, Nairn, Carroll
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Palacios-Orueta, Chuvieco, Parra, Carmona-Moreno
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Bachelet, Lenihan, Neilson, Drapek, Kittel
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Suffling, Munoz-Marquez, Perera, Zhao
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Gass, Robinson
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Asselin, Bergeron
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Epting, Verbyla
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Nute, Potter, Cheng, Dass, Glende, Maierv, Routh, Uchiyama, Wang, Witzig, Twery, Knopp, Thomasma, Rauscher
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The wildland-urban interface (WUI) is the area where houses meet or intermingle with undeveloped wildland vegetation. The WUI is thus a focal area for human-environment conflicts, such as the destruction of homes by wildfires, habitat fragmentation,...

Person: Radeloff, Hammer, Stewart, Fried, Holcomb, McKeefry
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'A common set of definitions is needed for terms relating to hazard and risk reduction in the wildland/urban interface [WUI]. ...When addressing a fire hazard in the WUI, prevention and mitigation must each play a role. ...To...

Person: Keller
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS