Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 57

Indigenous Peoples and local communities (IPLC) are affected by global environmental change because they directly rely on their immediate environment for meeting basic livelihood needs. Therefore, safeguarding and restoring ecosystem resilience is...

Person: Reyes-García, Fernández-Llamazares, McElwee, Molnár, Öllerer, Wilson, Brondizio
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The changing role of fire in forest landscapes shows that strategic forest management is necessary to safeguard urban water supplies.

Person: Hallema, Kinoshita, Martin, Robinne, Galleguillos, McNulty, Sun, Singh, Mordecai, Moore
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

We use a value of information (VOI) approach to demonstrate the cost effectiveness of using satellite imagery as part of Burn Area Emergency Response (BAER), a federal program that identifies imminent post-wildfire threats to human life and safety,...

Person: Bernknopf, Kuwayama, Gibson, Blakely, Mabee, Clifford, Quayle, Epting, Hardy, Goodrich
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Functionality has been incorporated into the Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool (AGWA) to assess the impacts of wildland fire on runoff and erosion. AGWA (...

Person: Latimer, Trettin, Bosch, Lane, Guertin, Goodrich, Burns, Sheppard, Patel, Clifford, Unkrich, Kepner, Levick
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires and events that follow such as flooding and erosion are natural disturbances in many ecosystems. However, when these types of postfire events threaten life, property, and resources they become a concern for resource managers, communities, and...

Person: Driscoll, Friggens
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires could have a strong impact on tundra environment by combusting surface vegetation and soil organic matter. For surface vegetation, many years are required to recover to pre-fire level. In this paper, by using C-band (VV/HV polarization) and L...

Person: Zhou, Liu, Jiang, Feng, Samsonov
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The future of boreal forests in Alaska, United States, will likely consist of more deciduous-dominant stands because larger and more severe fires facilitate the establishment of deciduous species such as trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and...

Person: Olnes, Kielland, Genet, Ruess
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Two researchers discuss findings from studies on how wildfires affect local economies across the U.S. west, from onset to recovery and beyond.

Person:
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fire characteristics, such as area burned, number of large fires, burn intensity, and fire season duration, have increased steadily over the past 30 years, resulting in substantial increases in the costs of suppressing fires and managing...

Person: Steblein, Miller
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Since 1973, the National Silviculture Workshop has provided a forum for USDA Forest Service managers and scientists to deliberate on management topics, issues, or challenges that reflect the progression of Federal forest management in the United States...

Person: Jain
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES