Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 981

Presentation given at the Fifth Symposium on Fire and Forest Meteorology and 2nd International Wildland Fire Ecology and Fire Management Congress, November 2003.

Person: Wimberly, Ohmann, Pierce, Gregory, Fried
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The following list of fire research topics and questions were generated by a survey of personnel from agencies and organizations within AWFCG in 2003. The topics were prioritized as High, Medium, or Low by the AWFCG Fire Research, Development and...

Person: York
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Kenai Lake Fire burned north of Kenai Lake on the Seward Ranger District of the Chugach National Forest from June 25 through July 8, 2001. The fire’s size was approximately 3260 acres. This assessment uses the FireFamily+ and RERAP (Rare Event Risk...

Person: Sorbel
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Two different storms started the Black Hills and Fish Lakes Fires on the Tetlin NWR. The Black Hills fire was started by lightning on July 16th. The Fish Lake Fire was first sighted on July 29th, probably resulting from lighting on July 21st. These two...

Person: Kwart, Henderson, Butteri, Paintner, Sorbel
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Here, in one concise book, is the essential story of fire. Noted environmental historian Stephen J. Pyne describes the evolution of fire through prehistoric and historic times down to the present, examining contemporary attitudes from a long-range,...

Person: Pyne
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The thrilling story of the most important firefighting efforts in the last 100 years as told by fire expert Stephen Pyne. Pyne relates the similarities between the vast fires of summer 2000 with the Great Fires of 1910 that swept across the northwest,...

Person: Pyne
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

'Painting, architecture, politics, even gardening and golf-all have their critics and commentators,' observes Stephen Pyne. 'Fire does not.' Aside from news reports on fire disasters, most writing about fire appears in government reports and scientific...

Person: Pyne
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

From the text ... 'This chapter focuses on the practical, management implications of the fire and climate change research that is reported in the earlier chapters of this volume. We start with an overview of fire management goals and strategies,...

Person: Veblen, Baker, Montenegro, Swetnam, Morgan, Defosse, Rodriguez
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Our experience in conducting fire history studies comes from regions with natural lakes and wetlands. Lake sites are used for most stratigraphic fire history studies, and our understanding of charcoal deposition and burial (i.e...

Person: Veblen, Baker, Montenegro, Swetnam, Whitlock, Anderson
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Pine-lichen woodlands in north-central British Columbia show a long period of successional development where reindeer lichens (Cladina spp.) dominate plant cover at the forest floor surface. However, in mid- to late-successional stands lichen cover is...

Person: Sulyma, Coxson
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS