Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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This dataset provides estimates of wildfire progression, as represented by date of burning (DoB), within fire scars across Alaska and Canada for the period 2001-2015. The estimated DoB was derived using an algorithm for identifying the first fire...

Person: Loboda, Hall
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Data
Source: FRAMES

From the Spring 2017 AFSC Remote Sensing Workshop: Opportunities to Apply Remote Sensing in Boreal/Arctic Wildfire Management and Science.

Person: Loehman
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

From the Spring 2017 AFSC Remote Sensing Workshop: Opportunities to Apply Remote Sensing in Boreal/Arctic Wildfire Management and Science.

Person: Ziel
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

This research addresses improvements to the detection and characterization of active wildfires in Alaska with satellite-based sensors. The VIIRS I-band Fire Detection Algorithm for High Latitudes (VIFDAHL) was developed and evaluated against existing...

Person: Waigl
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Chris Waigl presents a repeat of her thesis defense.

Person: Waigl
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Fire products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) imagery provide timely information for wildfire detection, monitoring, and characterization at the global scale. However, in...

Person: Waigl, Stuefer, Prakash, Ichoku
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The significant wildland fire potential forecasts included in this outlook represent the cumulative forecasts of the ten Geographic Area Predictive Services units and the National Predictive Services unit.

Person:
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In light of Earth's changing climate and growing human population, there is an urgent need to improve monitoring of natural and anthropogenic disturbances which effect forests' ability to sequester carbon and provide other ecosystem services. In this...

Person: Schroeder, Schleeweis, Moisen, Toney, Cohen, Freeman, Yang, Huang
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Extreme wildfires have substantial economic, social and environmental impacts, but there is uncertainty whether such events are inevitable features of the Earth’s fire ecology or a legacy of poor management and planning. We identify 478 extreme...

Person: Bowman, Williamson, Abatzoglou, Kolden, Cochrane, Smith
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Boreal forests and arctic tundra cover 33% of global land area and store an estimated 50% of total soil carbon. Because wildfire is a key driver of terrestrial carbon cycling, increasing fire activity in these ecosystems would likely have global...

Person: Young, Higuera, Duffy, Hu
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES