Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Year

Person

Displaying 1 - 10 of 118

In this short but powerful paper authors Mann, Rupp, Olson and Duffy look for evidence that Alaska’s forests are already responding to changes in fire regime. They use a tool that was developed in lock-step with Alaska fire management agencies called...

Person: Jandt
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire has a role in ecosystem services; naturally produced wildfires are important for the sustainability of many terrestrial biomes and fire is one of nature's primary carbon-cycling mechanisms. Under a warming climate, it is likely that fire frequency...

Person: Keywood, Kanakidou, Stohl, Dentener, Grassi, Meyer, Torseth, Edwards, Thompson, Lohmann, Burrows
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Stand-replacing fires are the dominant fire type in North American boreal forests. They leave a historical legacy of a mosaic landscape of different aged forest cohorts. This forest age dynamics must be included in vegetation models to accurately...

Person: Yue, Ciais, Luyssaert, Cadule, Harden, Randerson, Bellassen, Wang, Piao, Poulter, Viovy
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

There is a substantial amount of carbon stored in the permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in atmospheric temperature....

Person: Genet, McGuire, Barrett, Breen, Euskirchen, Johnstone, Kasischke, Melvin, Bennett, Mack, Rupp, Schuur, Turetsky, Yuan
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The wildland-urban interface (WUI) is the region where development meets and intermingles with wildlands. The WUI has an elevated fire risk due to the proximity of development and residents to wildlands with natural wildfire regimes. Existing methods...

Person: Whitman, Rapaport, Sherren
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The evaluation of area-specific risks for large fires is of great policy relevance to fire management and prevention. When analyzing data for the burned areas of large fires in Canada, we found that there are dramatic patterns that cannot be adequately...

Person: Wang, Ma, Li
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes from a network of 21 eddy covariance towers were upscaled to estimate the Alaskan CO2 budget from 2000 to 2011 by combining satellite remote sensing data, disturbance information, and a support vector regression model. Data...

Person: Ueyama, Ichii, Iwata, Euskirchen, Zona, Rocha, Harazono, Iwama, Nakai, Oechel
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Governments provide technical, political, and financial incentives to encourage timber harvesting for the purpose of mitigating natural forest disturbance. To provide guidance concerning these incentives, this paper integrates a natural disturbance...

Person: Sims
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A considerable investment in post-fire research over the past decade has improved our understanding of wildfire effects on soil, hydrology, erosion and erosion-mitigation treatment effectiveness. Using this new knowledge, we have developed several...

Person: Robichaud, Ashmun
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The LANDFIRE Program provides comprehensive vegetation and fuel datasets for the entire United States. As with many large-scale ecological datasets, vegetation and landscape conditions must be updated periodically to account for disturbances, growth,...

Person: Nelson, Connot, Peterson, Martin
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS