Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 152

This is a powerpoint slide presentation about modeling future successional trajectory and landscape flammability using the 2004 Boundary Fire in Alaska.

Person: Johnstone, Olsen, Rupp
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The Working Group I contribution to the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report describes progress in understanding of the human and natural drivers of climate change, observed climate change, climate processes and attribution, and estimates of projected future...

Person: Solomon, Qin, Manning, Marquis, Averyt, Tignor, Miller, Chen
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

An algorithm for wildfire occurrence is introduced for incorporation into a numerical model of drainage basin evolution. Within the model, fire return intervals are determined using a stochastic rule set and fire sizes are assigned according to a...

Person: Martin
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

It is now recognized that in the Canadian boreal forest, timber harvesting activities have replaced wildfires as the main stand-replacing disturbance. Differences in landscape patterns derived from these two sources of disturbance have, however, raised...

Person: Belleau, Bergeron, Leduc, Gauthier, Fall
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The strategy known as wildland fire use, in which lightning-ignited fires are allowed to burn, is rapidly gaining momentum in the fire management community. Managers need to know the consequences of an increase in area burned that might result from an...

Person: Miller
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Recent studies have shown that emissions of mercury (Hg), a hazardous air pollutant, from fires can be significant. However, to date, these emissions have not been well-quantified for the entire United States. Daily emissions of Hg from fires in the...

Person: Wiedinmyer, Friedli
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This study presents an exploratory analysis of Ontario lightning and fire ignition data*. Our main goal is to relate forest fire ignitions to lightning stroke occurrences. However, due to the sheer volume of the lightning data, as well as accuracy and...

Person: Woolford, Braun
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The decision of where, when, and how to apply the most effective postfire erosion mitigation treatments requires land managers to assess the risk of damaging runoff and erosion events occurring after a fire. To meet this challenge, the Erosion Risk...

Person: Robichaud, Elliot, Pierson, Hall, Moffet
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Classification of high-latitude landscapes into their appropriate biomes is important for many climate and global change-related issues. Unfortunately, large-scale, high-spatial-resolution observations of plant assemblages associated with these regions...

Person: Simpson, Stuart, Daly
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We introduce minimum dynamic reserves: a framework for the minimum reserve size required to incorporate natural disturbance and maintain ecological processes. The minimum dynamic reserve framework is a refinement of the minimum dynamic area concept,...

Person: Leroux, Schmiegelow, Lessard, Cumming
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS