Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 32

The report synthesizes the literature and current state of knowledge pertaining to reintroducing fire in stands where it has been excluded for long periods and the impact of these introductory fires on overstory tree injury and mortality. Only forested...

Person: Hood
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Only if the seed experiences an appropriate cue that informs it of a favourable current environment while (relatively) non-dormant will germination occur. Light confirms there has been some disturbance that has brought a buried...

Person: Thompson, Ooi
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'One way to protect the WUI is to restore surrounding landscapes to a healthy, resilient condition. Healthy, resilient forest ecosystems are less likely to see uncharacteristically severe wildfires that turn into human and...

Person: Tidwell, Brown
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Slash and burn agriculture is a traditional and predominant land use practice in Madagascar and its relevance in the context of forest preservation is significant. At the end of a cycle of culture, the fields become mostly weed covered and the soil...

Person: Raharimalala, Buttler, Ramohavelo, Razanaka, Sorg, Gobat
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Increased forest density resulting from decades of fire exclusion is often perceived as the leading cause of historically aberrant, severe, contemporary wildfires and insect outbreaks documented in some fire-prone forests of the western United States....

Person: Naficy, Sala, Keeling, Graham, DeLuca
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Large-scale natural disturbances are commonplace around the world. They can have profound effects on human infrastructure and populations, as well as substantially influencing key ecological processes, shaping landscapes, and affecting many species....

Person: Lindenmayer, Likens, Franklin
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Prescribed burning is a commonly advocated and historical practice for control of woody species encroachment into grasslands on all continents. However, desert grasslands of the southwestern United States often lack needed herbaceous fuel loads for...

Person: Havstad, James
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text (p. 34) ... 'Given the fact that climate change will cause many wildfires to burn larger and longer, the real issue in the near future will not be cost reduction or even cost containment, but rather, cost management. Expenditures may...

Person: Ingalsbee
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Descriptions of spatial patterns are important components of forest ecosystems, providing insights into functions and processes, yet basic spatial relationships between forest structures and fuels remain largely unexplored. We used standardized...

Person: Fry, Stephens
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildland fire management in the United States is caught in a rigidity trap, an inability to apply novelty and innovation in the midst of crisis. Despite wide recognition that public agencies should engage in ecological fire restoration, fire...

Person: Butler, Goldstein
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS