Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

The Jemez Mountains Project is a part of the North American Fire Learning Network (FLN), a collaborative venture of the USDA Forest Service, the Department of the Interior and The Nature Conservancy. Project partners include Bandelier National Monument...

Person: McCarthy, Wood
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Knick, Dobkin, Rotenberry, Schroeder, Vander Haegen, Van Riper
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Prescribed fire is generally considered a useful tool in ecosystem restoration and hazardous fuels reduction. There are many variables associated with the decision process and level of control managers can assert over prescribed burning (e.g., risk,...

Person: Kolden, Brown
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Over the past 15 years meteorological satellites have been increasingly used for land surface applications, including fire detection and monitoring. Several automated algorithms now provide satellite derived fire products in near real time for hazards...

Person: Feltz, Moreau, Prins, Claid-Cook, Brown
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Landsat imagery have been archived since 1972. These data provide an opportunity evaluate historical fires and review the recovery of the burned landscape. These data provide useful insights for management and planning. Landsat-based historical fire...

Person: Howard, McKinley
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Since August of 2000 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have been used to detect and monitor biomass burning in the Western Hemisphere on a half-hourly basis using the...

Person: Schmidt, Prins
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We developed a GIS model, BurnPro, to estimate the probability of burning over a landscape. BurnPro estimates the annual probability of burning across the landscape from information on ignitions, rate of spread through fuels, historical weather,...

Person: Miller, Davis, Black
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From its inception early in the 20th century, fire management developed as a strongly directed program with a one-dimensional focus of fire control. Following a name change to fire management in the early 1970's, it evolved into a multi-...

Person: Zimmerman, Lasko
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The demand for a nationally consistent condition variable for wildland fire and fuel management developed as a result of the 1988, 1990s, and 2000 fire seasons. Coming internally from administration and agency leadership and externally from Congress...

Person: Bunnell
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire is an important and controversial issue in protected area management in México. Public opinion perceive wildfires as one of the principal causes of forest degradation and government agencies in charge of forest management and conservation invest...

Person: Jardel, Ramírez-Villeda, Balcazar, Castillo-Navarro
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS