Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 34

The 1978 National Fire-Danger Rating System does not work well in the humid environment of the Eastern United States. System modifications to correct problems and their operational impact on System users are described. A new set of 20 fuel models is...

Person: Burgan
Year: 1988
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Presents current (1988) fireline production rates for bulldozers, by size of machine, fuel type, slope, and site conditions. Includes nomograms and a master table for estimating production rates. Describes how data were collected and production rates...

Person: Phillips, George, Nelson
Year: 1988
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Four commercially available forest fire retardants were studied to quantify their capabilities for flammability reduction using standard laboratory conditions and procedures. All the retardants proved to be closely matched in reducing flammability.

Person: Blakely
Year: 1988
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The corrosivity of long-term wildland fire retardants delivered by airtankers has been a continuing concern since the beginning of the retardant program in 1955. During the fall of 1986, the severity of corrosion was investigated at air-attack bases in...

Person: George, Gehring
Year: 1988
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fires simultaneously burning in hundreds of square kilometers could result from a nuclear weapon explosion. The strong buoyancy field of such large area fires induces high-velocity fire winds that turn upward in the burning region. This results in the...

Person: Small, Heikes
Year: 1988
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A laboratory experiment was performed to determine the effect of slope on the downhill spread rate of forest fire. Results with beds of pine needles showed that the spread rate decreased to 64 percent of the level rate as slope was raised to 22 degrees...

Person: Van Wagner
Year: 1988
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Dry, unstable air increases the probability that wildland fires will become large and/or erratic. This paper describes an atmospheric index for these fires, based on the environmental lapse rate of a layer of air coupled with its moisture content. In...

Person: Haines
Year: 1988
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

[Excerpted from text] In 1949, 32 men died as a direct result of forest fires on national forest, State, and private lands. Most of them lost their lives because of extreme fire conditions which resulted in blow-ups. These comments will be confined to...

Person: Brown
Year: 1950
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

[Excerpted from text] Forest fires are known to behave in a variety of ways, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. Prompt suppression requires that the fire boss, in estimating the probabilities of control within the allowable period, consider factors...

Person: Crosby
Year: 1949
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Holocene glacial fluctuations between Arctic, central interior, and southern maritime Alaska are broadly synchronous. This synchrony is evident from a review of work in 11 study areas with varying numbers of glaciers (3-100), glacier types (subpolar...

Person: Calkin
Year: 1988
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES