Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 34

The distribution of individual species and of vegetation types offers clues to the amoral role of fire in the native temperate forests of what are now the 48 contiguous United States. Through the selective process, fire has helped adapt species....

Person: Hendrickson
Year: 1972
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The National Fire-Danger Rating (NFDR) System produces three indexes-Occurrence, Burning, and Fire Load-that measure relative fire potentials. These indexes are derived from the fire behavior components-Spread, Energy Release, and Ignition-plus a...

Person: Deeming, Lancaster, Fosberg, Furman, Schroeder
Year: 1972
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The benefits from fire use - including hazard reduction, silvicultural manipulation, pathogen control, and nutrient recycling - might be forfeited by public reaction to smoke, whether harmful or not. Generally, the public desires alternatives to...

Person: Philpot, Johnson, George, Wallace, Blakely
Year: 1972
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Ponderosa pine needle and aspen excelsior fuel beds, chosen because they exhibit different chemical fuel characteristics, were treated with various amounts of ammonium sulfate and ammonium phosphate and burned in a wind tunnel under controlled...

Person: George, Blakely
Year: 1972
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

[Excerpted from text] In 1949, 32 men died as a direct result of forest fires on national forest, State, and private lands. Most of them lost their lives because of extreme fire conditions which resulted in blow-ups. These comments will be confined to...

Person: Brown
Year: 1950
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

[Excerpted from text] Forest fires are known to behave in a variety of ways, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. Prompt suppression requires that the fire boss, in estimating the probabilities of control within the allowable period, consider factors...

Person: Crosby
Year: 1949
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The combustion products (smoke) from forest wildfires or prescribed burns are often considered on a par with any other emission that might affect air quality. But enough is known about smoke from woody fuels to indicate that its importance is limited...

Person: Hall
Year: 1972
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The long-established zonal divisions of the boreal forest-forest-tundra, open woodland, and closed forest-are examined in the light of new information about energy income and of satellite photographs of the divisions themselves. The North American...

Person: Hare, Ritchie
Year: 1972
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Experience with wildland fires soon teaches that no two are exactly alike. Fire behavior is not an independent phenomenon-it is the product of the environment in which the fire is burning. Environment has been defined as 'surrounding conditions,...

Person: Countryman
Year: 1972
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Description not entered.

Person: Noste
Year: 1972
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES