Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Person: Brown, Ferguson, Flannigan
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[Excerpted from text] In 1949, 32 men died as a direct result of forest fires on national forest, State, and private lands. Most of them lost their lives because of extreme fire conditions which resulted in blow-ups. These comments will be confined to...

Person: Brown
Year: 1950
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The purpose of this pre-proposal is to investigate the complex decision environment related to predicting preparedness levels for the national wildland fire program to a degree sufficient to develop a proposal for submission to the Joint Fire Sciences...

Person: Day, Brown, Hitchcock, Latham, Wiitala, Bischof, Caffin, Dickenson, Dickinson, Fitzpatrick, Guches, Hendren, Heppler, Lentz, Lococo, Plattes, Shetler, Simos, Strohmeier, Wordell, Johnson
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire suppression expenditures on national forest land have increased over the last 35 years, exceeding US$ 1 billion in 2000 and 2002. These increases in expenditure have been attributed, in part, to a century of aggressive wildfire suppression,...

Person: Donovan, Brown
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Forest and rangeland fire was once a common land management tool. Native Americans as well as early settlers and prospectors used fire for various purposes. But as the country gradually filled with more settlers, and as forest resources became more...

Person: Donovan, Brown
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Major concerns after wildfires are the increased erosion and flooding potential due to loss of the protective forest floor layer, loss of water storage, and the creation of water repellent soil conditions. Treatments to mitigate postfire erosion and...

Person: Moglen, Robichaud, Brown
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This state-of-knowledge review about the effects of fire on soils and water can assist land and fire managers with information on the physical, chemical, and biological effects of fire needed to successfully conduct ecosystem management, and...

Person: Neary, Ryan, DeBano, Tiddemann, Ninne, Jocoby, Zwolinski, Ryan, Robichaud, Reardon, Neary, Landsberg, Knoepp, Ffolliott, Elliot, DeBano, Busse, Brown, Beyers
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES