Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Person: Lyon, Huff, Hooper, Telfer, Schreiner, Smith, Lyon, Brown, Huff, Smith
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Changing the journal's name from Control to Management signaled a programmatic shift that continues today as the wildland fire community strives to improve firefighter safety while striking the right balance among...

Person: Brown
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Person: Brown
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Lessons learned: Deeply shocked by the Mann Gulch tragedy and subsequent firefighter fatalies in California, the Forest Service initiated reforms to prevent future disasters. Thanks to improved training, equipment, and safety...

Person: Rothermel, Brown
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Using standard terminology improves communication for a safer, better wildland fire organization. ...As policy evolves and new technologies emerge, wildland fire terminology is subject to constant change. ...The National...

Person: Brown
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text... 'Fire is a key ecological process within most ecosystems in the United States and Canada. An understanding of factors controlling the initial response of vegetation to fire is essential to its management. Fire effects on plants...

Person: Brown, Smith, Miller
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text...'Major forest types include those where aspen, eastern white and red pine stands, and jack pine stands are found either as fire-maintained seral types or exceptionally as climax stands (see table 3-1 for FRES, Kuchler, and SAF...

Person: Brown, Smith, Duchesne, Hawkes
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

At the request of public and private wildland fire managers who recognized a need to assimilate current fire effects knowledge, we produced this state-of-the-art integrated series of documents relevant to management of ecosystems. The series covers our...

Person: Brown, Smith, Brown
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Landscapes are often heterogeneous in abiotic factors such as topography, climate, and soil, yet little 15 known about how these factors may influence the spatial distribution of primary productivity. We report estimates of aboveground net primary...

Person: Hansen, Rotella, Kraska, Brown
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Woody debris provides habitat for a great variety of wildlife. Up to 213 of our wildlife species use dead wood structures or woody debris for some portion of their life cycles. Activities during fire suppression such as snag and tree removal eliminates...

Person: Brown
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS