Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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In the aftermath of the Greater Yellowstone Area fires of 1988, scientists from all across North America recognized the once in a lifetime research opportunities these fires presented. For a host of reasons, the Yellowstone fires were unique, due...

Person:
Year: 1990
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The 1988 fires created a lot of changes in land cover in Greater Yellowstone Area, an area of several million acres administered by the Park Service, Forest Service and other Federal, State and private owners. Remotely sensed data, such as aerial...

Person: Lachowski, Rodman, Shovic
Year: 1990
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire, either as a natural occurrence or a management tool, can have beneficial effects on the environment, and its use offers opportunities for reducing fuel loads, disposing of slash, preparing seedbeds, thinning stands, increasing herbaceous plant...

Person: Krammes, Ffolliott
Year: 1990
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Kilgore
Year: 1976
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire managers from five western regions of the USDA Forest Service were surveyed to determine which decision factors most strongly influenced their fire-risk behavior. Three fire-decision contexts were tested: Escaped Wildfire, Prescribed Burning, and...

Person: Cortner, Taylor, Carpenter, Cleaves
Year: 1990
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Mutch
Year: 1990
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Urban-wildland issues have become among the most contentious and problematic issues for forest managers. Using data drawn from surveys conducted by the authors and others, this article discusses how public knowledge and perceptions of fire policies and...

Person: Cortner, Gardner, Taylor
Year: 1990
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

ANNOTATION: This article discusses social considerations with respect to public wildland forest fire policy. Social attitudes, beliefs and behavioral intentions of wildland fire are described as well as the public's knowledge of the effects of...

Person: Manfredo, Fishbein, Hass, Watson
Year: 1990
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

This study was undertaken to estimate the short-term effects of fire on plant response and moose (Alces alces Miller) browse following the Rosie Creek fire near Fairbanks, Alaska. The fire consumed forests of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michc...

Person: MacCracken, Viereck
Year: 1990
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

In 1931 Herbert L. Stoddard, the Dean of Game Management in his classic investigation of the Bobwhite Quail stated: 'While an immediate and direct effect of burning is, of course always apparent, the general effect of long-continued annual or...

Person: Komarek
Year: 1976
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS