Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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A synthesis was carried out to analyze information available to quantify fire activity and burned area across North America, including a comparison of different data sources and an assessment of how variations in burned area estimate impact carbon...

Person: Kasischke, Loboda, Giglio, French, Hoy, de Jong, Riano
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Large fire years in which >1% of the landscape burns are becoming more frequent in the Alaskan (USA) interior, with four large fire years in the past 10 years, and 79 000 km2 (17% of the region) burned since 2000. We modeled fire severity conditions...

Person: Barrett, McGuire, Hoy, Kasischke
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

To assess ongoing changes in high latitude vegetation productivity we compared spatiotemporal patterns in remotely sensed vegetation productivity in the tundra and boreal zones of North America and Eurasia. We compared the long-term GIMMS (Global...

Person: Beck, Goetz
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'One of the BAER [Burned Area Emergency Response] team's first tasks is to develop a soil burn severity map that highlights the areas of low, moderate, and high burn severity within a wildfire perimeter.'

Person: Clark, McKinley
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire is a complex and critical ecological process that is an integral component of western Canadian terrestrial ecosystems. Therefore, Canadian land management agencies such as Parks Canada require detailed burn severity data for the monitoring and...

Person: Soverel, Coops, Perrakis, Daniels, Gergel
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

With the recently observed and projected trends of growing wildland fire occurrence in high northern latitudes, satellite-based burned area mapping in these regions is becoming increasingly important for scientific and fire management communities....

Person: Loboda, Hoy, Giglio, Kasischke
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Research activities focused on estimating the direct emissions of carbon from wildland fires across North America are reviewed as part of the North American Carbon Program disturbance synthesis. A comparison of methods to estimate the loss of carbon...

Person: French, de Groot, Jenkins, Rogers, Alvarado, Amiro, de Jong, Goetz, Hoy, Hyer, Keane, Law, McKenzie, McNulty, Ottmar, Perez-Salicrup, Randerson, Robertson, Turetsky
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Van Wagner
Year: 1965
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Managers have been coming to the Fire Effects Information System (FEIS) for reviews of scientific knowledge about fire effects since 1986. Prior to this project, FEIS provided relatively little coverage of invasive plant species in the eastern United...

Person: Smith, Zouhar, Fryer
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire in the forested tropics has profound environmental, economic, and social impacts at multiple geographical scales. Causes of tropical fires are widely documented, although research contributions are from many disciplines, and each tends to focus on...

Person: Carmenta, Parry, Blackburn, Vermeylen, Barlow
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES