Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 78

The changing role of fire in forest landscapes shows that strategic forest management is necessary to safeguard urban water supplies.

Person: Hallema, Kinoshita, Martin, Robinne, Galleguillos, McNulty, Sun, Singh, Mordecai, Moore
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland firefighters work in complex and dynamic environments, with many dangers that pose serious threats to their safety. Falling snags and rocks, steep and rugged terrain, and rapid increases in fire behavior are just some of the dangers that...

Person: Page, Butler
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fires that occur outside buildings, improvements, and structures, whether fueled by grass, brush, forest, timber, or other materials, are the wildland fires we deal with in the fire service. A wildland fire can take many forms: thousands of acres of...

Person: Harbour
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Historically, wildland fire fundamentally shaped the American landscape, and it continues to do so today in a highly modified environment. Forest, brush, and range fires were common in 'presettlement' times, and the American Indians realized the...

Person: Christiansen
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

FireCLIME (Fire-Climate Landscape Interactions in Montane Ecosystems) Vulnerability Assessment v3.1 is a macro-enabled Excel file (xlsm). A user guide is also available below.

Person: Friggens
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Tool
Source: FRAMES

Changes in global fire activity are influenced by a multitude of factors including land‐cover change, policies, and climatic conditions. This study uses 17 climate models to evaluate when changes in fire weather, as realized through the Fire Weather...

Person: Abatzoglou, Williams, Barbero
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This article develops a theoretical model to analyze the impact of policies to promote defensible space — the most prominent wildfire risk mitigation strategy on private property — on the overall level of defensible space in a community when homeowners...

Person: Taylor
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland firefighting requires managers to make decisions in complex decision environments that hold many uncertainties; these decisions need to be adapted dynamically over time as fire behavior evolves. Models used in firefighting decisions should...

Person: Belval, Wei, Bevers
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The U.S. Geological Survey's Wildland Fire Science Program produces fundamental information to identify the causes of wildfires, understand the impacts and benefits of both wildfires and prescribed fires, and help prevent and manage larger,...

Person: Steblein, Miller, Soileau
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A demonstration of the Landscape Burn Probability in IFTDSS.

Person: Noble, Anderson
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES