Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

A diversity of partners and interests, federal to private, came together to identify current challenges and research in the wildland fire and air quality impacts realm. Meeting management needs and the opportunity to learn from one another’s expert...

Person:
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This webinar presented by Wayne Cascio June 21, 2017 highlighted updates to the Wildfire Smoke Guide, as well as the Smoke Sense app, which is a mobile application that gets air quality information to people impacted by wildfire smoke, and helps those...

Person: Cascio
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Organizational hierarchy is an inescapable aspect of many exemplary high reliability organizations (HROs). As organizations begin to adopt HRO theorizing to improve practice, it is increasingly important to explain how HRO principles—which assume the...

Person: Jahn, Black
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Incident Management Teams (IMTs) combat the toughest wildfires in the United States, contending with forces of nature as well as many stakeholders with different agendas. Prior literature on IMTs suggested roles and cognitive sensemaking as key...

Person: Boyatzis, Thiel, Rochford, Black
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Natural Hazard Mitigation Plans (NHMP) and Community Wildfire Protection Plans (CWPP) both benefit communities striving to reduce risk to natural hazards. Though one plan is focused on the wildfire hazard and other is focused on multi-natural hazards,...

Person: Holt, Cleverley, Holfeltz
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Before the rise of social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter, public information offi­cers on wildfires depended on tradi­tional mass media, including newspapers, television, and radio, to get important messages about danger­ous wildfires to the...

Person: Chambers, Champ
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Throughout the late 19th century and most of the 20th century, risks associated with wildfire were addressed by suppressing fires as quickly as possible. However, by the 1960s, it became clear that fire exclusion policies were having adverse effects on...

Person: Wilson, McCaffrey, Toman
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Indigenous peoples' detailed traditional knowledge about fire, although superficially referenced in various writings, has not for the most part been analyzed in detail or simulated by resource managers, wildlife biologists, and ecologists…. Instead,...

Person: Lake, Wright, Morgan, McFadzen, McWethy, Stevens-Rumann
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Although communication is often cited as a contributor to organisational accidents, complexities of the communication context are still understudied. In training materials and some investigative reports, communication is often presented as an equipment...

Person: Fox, Gabor, Thomas, Ziegler, Black
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Person: Schuster
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES