Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Statistical models using historical observations are a critical tool for anticipating future fire regimes. A key uncertainty with these models is the ability to project outside the range of historical observations, often done when making future...

Person: Young, Higuera, Abatzoglou, Duffy, Hu
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Post-harvest regeneration failure of white spruce (Picea glauca Moench [Voss]), has led to concerns of 'de-coniferization' on productive site in the Alaskan boreal forest. Forest management in the region sought historically to increase spruce...

Person: Allaby, Juday, Young
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Post-harvest regeneration failure of white spruce (Picea glauca Moench [Voss]), has led to concerns of 'de-coniferization' on productive site in the Alaskan boreal forest. Forest management in the region sought historically to increase spruce...

Person: Allaby, Juday, Young
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Projections of future fire activity from statistical models are a powerful tool for anticipating 21st-century fire regimes. In previous work, we developed a set of statistical models that predict the likelihood of fires over 30-yr timescales in Alaskan...

Person: Boschetti, Higuera, Young
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Northern high latitude climates are rapidly changing nearly faster than the rest of the globe, suggesting that fire regimes in these ecosystems may be particularly vulnerable to future change. In Alaska, key JFSP research priorities are to understand...

Person: Higuera, Boschetti, Young
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Projections of future fire activity, derived from statistical models, are a powerful tool for anticipating 21st-century fire regimes. In previous work, we developed a set of statistical models that captures fire-climate relationships at 30-yr...

Person: Young
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Boreal forests and arctic tundra cover 33% of global land area and store an estimated 50% of total soil carbon. Because wildfire is a key driver of terrestrial carbon cycling, increasing fire activity in these ecosystems would likely have global...

Person: Young, Higuera, Duffy, Hu
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES