Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

From the Summary...'Historically, fires have repeatedly burned nearly every square foot of northern Rocky Mountain forests. Fire damage was especially severe during the 75 years following 1860, and much of this was due to promiscuous burning by...

Person: Wellner
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Between 1931 and 1961 Canadian forest fire researchers gathered a vast quantity of data on weather, fuel moisture and test fire behavior. The original purpose of the data was primarily for the development of forest fire danger tables. The data was...

Person: Simard
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Standard drying conditions in the laboratory have been related to the diurnal fluctuations of temperature and humidity to define a standard drying day for forest fuels. The mean equilibrium moisture content of a fuel on a standard drying day is...

Person: Fosberg, Lancaster, Schroeder
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire retardants used in combating forest and range fires have been accused of killing livestock by nitrate poisoning. Ammonia-based retardants cannot cause nitrate poisoning directly. They must first enter the soil, be converted to nitrates, then be...

Person: Dodge
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The fire whirlwind, an erratic and violent phenomenon associated with the behavior of intense fires, may generate velocities comparable to those reached in tornadoes. All the conditions essential to the formation of fire whirlwinds can be readily...

Person: Byram, Martin
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

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Person: Lemon
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Evert
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

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Person: Schroeder, Buck
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[Excerpt from text] The fire weather occurring on a particular day is a dominant factor in the fire potential for that day. Fire climate well may be thought of as the synthesis of daily fire weather over a long period of time, is a dominant factor in...

Person: Schroeder, Buck
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

From objectives (page 13): 'Objectives of the study were: (1) to develop sufficient understanding of the effects of forest fires on water quality of Alaskan streams so that it may be possible to make rational decisions for allocating manpower and...

Person: Lotspeich, Mueller, Frey
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS