Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 68

From the Introduction ... 'It is a well known fact that the presence of moisture exerts considerable influence on the difficulty of ignition and the subsequent rate of combustion of forest fuels. Its effect on ignition is primarily a result of the...

Person: Simard
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the Introduction: 'The purpose of the present study is to determine the rate at which various fuels can absorb water. The present study is concerned primarily with relative absorption and drying rates between various types of fuels. Future...

Person: Simard
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the Introduction:'This paper has been prepared to provide some background information on the present utilization of airtankers in suppressing forest fires in Canada and to explore what might be done to improve the use pattern of this...

Person: Williams, McLean, Hodgson
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This study was initiated to determine the impact of clearcutting, slashburning and skidroads on deep (>3 feet) coarse glacial soil at low elevations (<1000 ft. above sea level) of coastal British Columbia.

Person: Willington
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Because cribs of wood are widely used to produce experimental fires it is sometimes necessary to predict their burning behavior especially when their burning rate is not controlled primarily by some other factor such as the window opening in a...

Person: Smith, Thomas
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Improved utilization of bark is dependent, to a large degree, on knowledge of its properties. Very little information is available on physical properties of bark, however, and none is available on volumetric changes of bark due...

Person: Martin
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A model forest canopy was designed to simulate the meteorological characteristics of typical live forests. Measurements were made of velocity, turbulence, drag, and gaseous plume spread within the simulated canopy. The resulting data compares favorably...

Person: Meroney
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text... 'Of all the meteorological elements which are known to affect forest fuel flammability and fire behaviour, rain is the most variable in its areal distribution. in its frequency, and particularly in its amount. While the...

Person: Webb
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This note outlines the objectives and problems of prescribed burning as a tool of forest management. The importance of a number of weather factors is discussed and suggestions are presented for provision of effective weather guidance to forest officers...

Person: Turner
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A method for estimating wood volume on the ground is described. It requires only a diameter tally of pieces intersected by a sample line, and application of a simple formula. Theory for the formula is presented, and practical application discussed. The...

Person: Van Wagner
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS