Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 61 - 70 of 478

Biomass burning is a major source of aerosols that affect air quality and the Earth's radiation budget. Current estimates of biomass burning emissions vary markedly due to uncertainties in biomass density, combustion efficiency, emission factor,...

Person: Zhang, Kondragunta, Schmidt, Kogan
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In this paper, we explore empirically whether the USDA Forest Service's litigation success rate in each Forest Service region helps explain the persistent regional effects noted by Laband et al. (Laband, D.N., Gonzalez-Caban, A., and Hussain, A. (...

Person: Laband, Hussain, Gonzalez-Caban
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Uncertainty is a dominant feature of decision making in forestry and wildlife management. Aggravating this challenge is the irreversibility of some decisions, resulting in the loss of economic opportunities or the extirpation of wildlife populations....

Person: Morgan, Ben, Lasserre
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A temperate peatland located in the St. Lawrence lowlands (Southern Quebec) was studied in order to specify the past influence of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on its postglacial development. Seven profiles were analysed for pollen,...

Person: Muller, Richard, Talon
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Smouldering wildfires propagate slowly through surface and subsurface organic layers of the forest ground and severely affect the soil, producing physical, chemical and biological changes. These effects are caused by the prolonged heating and the large...

Person: Rein, Cleaver, Ashton, Pironi, Torero
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In western North America, quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) is the most common hardwood in montane landscapes. Fire suppression, grazing and wildlife management practices, and climate patterns of the past century are all potential threats to aspen...

Person: Rogers, Ryel
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Forest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO2. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests...

Person: Slik, Bernard, van Beek, Breman, Eichhorn
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Management around wilderness parks ideally requires thorough fire suppression in proximate settled and commercially exploited lands and natural fire within protected areas. To satisfy these requirements, we explored a potential regional firebreak (...

Person: Suffling, Grant, Feick
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Some of the greatest forest health impacts in North America are caused by invasive forest insects and pathogens (e.g., emerald ash borer and sudden oak death in the US), by severe outbreaks of native pests (e.g., mountain pine beetle in Canada), and...

Person: Tkacz, Moody, Villa-Castillo, Fenn
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'This special issue of Catena entitled 'Fire effects on soil properties' is a contribution of the most recent works related to research by scientists concerning fire and soil processes.The frequency and severity of...

Person: Ubeda, Mataix-Solera
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS