Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Editorial comment ... 'The Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) is a common story line in many of today's wildfire events. The WUI concept was formally introduced in 1987 Forest Service Research budget documents but was not acknowledged as a major...

Person: Sommers
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Approaches for forecasting wildfire suppression costs in advance of a wildfire season are demonstrated for two lead times: fall and spring of the current fiscal year (Oct. 1-Sept. 30). Model functional forms are derived from aggregate expressions of a...

Person: Prestemon, Abt, Gebert
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Climate change, increased wildland fuels, and residential development patterns in fire-prone areas all combine to make wildfire risk mitigation an important public policy issue. One approach to wildfire risk mitigation is to encourage homeowners to use...

Person: Butry, Donovan
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The intensification of forest management in Canada has been advocated as a possible solution to the conundrum that increasing demand for conservation areas and increasing pressure for timber production have created. The benefits and disadvantages of...

Person: Mathey, Krcmar, Innes, Vertinsky
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

After wildfire, land managers are often called on to undertake complex restoration activities while also managing relations with wildfire-devastated communities. This research investigates the community-US Forest Service agency relations in the...

Person: Ryan, Hamin
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

After the containment of large wildland fires, major onsite and downstream effects including lost soil productivity, watershed response, increased vulnerability to invasive weeds, and downstream sedimentation can cause threats to human life and...

Person: Calkin, Jones, Hyde
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Most studies of wildland fire and residential development have focused on the cost of firefighting and solutions such as fuel reduction and fire-safe home building. Although some studies quantify the number of homes being built near forests, little...

Person: Gude, Rasker, van den Noort
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Forest wildfires are a growing issue of concern in the United States, with average annual area burned escalating rapidly compared to levels in the 1980s and 1990s (approximately 1.2 million hectares/year in the 80s vs. 2.8...

Person: Teeter
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Provincial forest management agencies across Canada are attempting to recover suppression costs plus losses to real property due to human-caused fires when negligence is involved. These agencies are responsible for investigating these fires, and they...

Person: Woodard
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The cumulative impacts of human and natural activity on forest landscapes in Alberta are clear. Human activity, such as forestry and oil and gas development, and natural processes such as wildfire leave distinctive marks on the composition, age class...

Person: Yamasaki, Duchesneau, Doyon, Russell, Gooding
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS