Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Postfire succession in the Alaskan boreal forest follows several different pathways, the most common being self-replacement and species-dominance relay. In self-replacement, canopy-dominant tree species replace themselves as the postfire dominants. It...

Person: Kurkowski, Mann, Rupp, Verbyla
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The maximum solar elevation is typically less than 50 degrees in the Alaskan boreal region and solar elevation varies substantially during the growing season. Because of the relatively low solar elevation at boreal latitudes, the effect of topography...

Person: Verbyla, Kasischke, Hoy
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

There has been considerable interest in the recent literature regarding the assessment of post-fire effects on forested areas within the North American boreal forest. Assessing the physical and ecological effects of fire in boreal forests has far-...

Person: French, Kasischke, Hall, Murphy, Verbyla, Hoy, Allen
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

As part of a long-term moose browse/fire severity study, we used the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) with historic Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery to estimate fire severity from a 1983 wildfire in interior Alaska. Fire severity was estimated in the...

Person: Verbyla, Lord
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The maximum solar elevation is typically less than 50 degrees in the Alaskan boreal region and solar elevation varies substantially during the growing season. Because of the relatively low solar elevation at boreal latitudes, the effect of topography...

Person: Verbyla, Kasischke, Hoy
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

There has been considerable interest in the recent literature regarding the assessment of post-fire effects on forested areas within the North American boreal forest. Assessing the physical and ecological effects of fire in boreal forests has far-...

Person: French, Kasischke, Hall, Murphy, Verbyla, Hoy, Barnes
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES