Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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After the containment of large wildland fires, major onsite and downstream effects including lost soil productivity, watershed response, increased vulnerability to invasive weeds, and downstream sedimentation can cause threats to human life and...

Person: Calkin, Jones, Hyde
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Rehabilitation of skid trails, temporary roads, and log landings is required for many harvested sites in British Columbia; however, more information is needed regarding practical methods to return these access areas to productive forest. Lodgepole pine...

Person: Campbell, Bulmer, Jones, Philip, Zwiazek
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Jones, Johnston
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Large wildland fires are complex, costly events influenced by a vast array of physical, climatic, and social factors. Changing climate, fuel buildup due to past suppression, and increasing populations in the wildland-urban interface have all been...

Person: Canton-Thompson, Gebert, Thompson, Jones, Calkin, Donovan
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

After the containment of large wildland fires, major onsite and downstream effects including lost soil productivity, watershed response, increased vulnerability to invasive weeds, and downstream sedimentation can cause threats to human life and...

Person: Calkin, Jones, Hyde
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

We stood with the gray-haired ranger on a high ridge in Oregon overlooking a thousand square miles of forest. [from the text] The night before, my GEOGRAPHIC colleague Jay Johnston and I had watched a particularly violent thunderstorm of the type that...

Person: Jones, Johnston
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Recent observations and model simulations have highlighted the sensitivity of the forest-tundra ecotone to climatic forcing. In contrast, paleoecological studies have not provided evidence of tree-line fluctuations in response to Holocene climatic...

Person: Tinner, Bigler, Gedye, Gregory-Eaves, Jones, Kaltenrieder, Krahenbuhl, Hu
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The FRCC Guidebook provides step-by-step instructions for conducting assessments with the FRCC Standard Landscape Worksheet Method and an overview of the FRCCMapping Tool GIS software used for the Standard Landscape Mapping Method. The Standard...

Person: Hann, Shlisky, Havlina, Schon, Barrett, DeMeo, Pohl, Menakis, Hamilton, Jones, Levesque, Frame
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The FRCC Mapping Tool quantifies the departure of vegetation conditions from a set of reference conditions representing the historical range of variation. The tool, which operates from an ArcGIS platform, derives several metrics of departure by...

Person: Hutter, Jones, Zeiler
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Area Change Tool (ACT) was developed in response to the need for a tool that could be used to help design and delineate fuel and vegetation prescriptions as well as edit raster layers to accurately portray treatment outcomes. These edited data can...

Person: Hutter, Jones, Hann, Levesque
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES