Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 43

Understanding how changes in the boreal fire regime will affect high latitude climate requires knowledge of the sensitivity of the surface energy budget to shifts in vegetation cover. We measured components of the surface energy budget in three...

Person: Liu, Randerson
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We assessed the multidecadal effects of boreal forest fire on surface albedo using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite observations within the perimeters of burn scars in interior Alaska. Fire caused albedo to increase...

Person: Lyons, Jin, Randerson
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A 2005 biomass burning (wildfire, prescribed, and agricultural) emission inventory has been developed for the contiguous United States using a newly developed simplified method of combining information from multiple sources for use in the US EPA's...

Person: Pouliot, Pace, Roy, Pierce, Mobley
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The area burned in the North American boreal forest is controlled by the frequency of mid-tropospheric blocking highs that cause rapid fuel drying. Climate controls the area burned through changing the dynamics of large-scale teleconnection patterns (...

Person: Fauria, Johnson
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Biomass burning is a major source of aerosols that affect air quality and the Earth's radiation budget. Current estimates of biomass burning emissions vary markedly due to uncertainties in biomass density, combustion efficiency, emission factor,...

Person: Zhang, Kondragunta, Schmidt, Kogan
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'A cooperative regional strategy has been developed to mitigate the negative effects of fires in the region. The Fire Management Cooperation Strategy for the Caribbean 2006-2011, developed jointly with the representatives of the...

Person: Rodriguez
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Uncertainty is a dominant feature of decision making in forestry and wildlife management. Aggravating this challenge is the irreversibility of some decisions, resulting in the loss of economic opportunities or the extirpation of wildlife populations....

Person: Morgan, Ben, Lasserre
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Forest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO2. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests...

Person: Slik, Bernard, van Beek, Breman, Eichhorn
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The northern Temiscamingue region (western Quebec) sustained regional-scale pulses of natural disturbances during the 1850-2000 period, such as severe fires during the 1908-1926 period, two severe spruce budworm outbreaks that occurred in 1909-1918 and...

Person: Bouchard, Kneeshaw, Bergeron
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Aerosols from wildfires are the primary aerosols in the Arctic atmosphere during the summer months. These aerosols occur in large, increasing quantities and impact the sensitive radiative balance in the Arctic. FROSTFIRE, a controlled burn in a Long-...

Person: Cahill, Cahill, Perry
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS