Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

We used a national household survey to examine knowledge, attitudes, and preferences pertaining to wildland fire. First, we present nationwide results and trends. Then, we examine opinions across region and race. Despite some regional variation,...

Person: Bowker, Lim, Cordell, Green, Rideout-Hanzak, Johnson
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

When it comes to unnecessary risk and exposure to heat, smoke, fatigue, and noise, could you be a “Bad Ass” or a “Dumb Ass”? Maybe it’s time you put a pinch of practical in your tactical pause. George Broyles, Fire and Fuels Project Leader for the U.S...

Person:
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

What happens when you are “all in” in your wildland fire service job and you suddenly get the boot—whether through mandatory retirement, freak accident, family demands, or any other “involuntary separation”? “Why Identity Matters” is the focus of this...

Person:
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Suicide in the Wildland Fire Service. What are the statistics on wildland firefighter suicide deaths? Why does such a negative stigma prevent discussing suicide in our business? What should we all know about suicide and suicide prevention? Answers to...

Person:
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Suicide in the Wildland Fire Service. What are the statistics on wildland firefighter suicide deaths? Why does such a negative stigma prevent discussing suicide in our business? What should we all know about suicide and suicide prevention? Answers to...

Person:
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Roger Ottmar, Research Forester with the USFS Pacific Northwest Fire & Environmental Research Applications Team, gave a talk on air quality, wildfire smoke components and smoke impacts on human health with an eye to how air quality regulations may...

Person: Ottmar
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Kris Ray from the Air Quality Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation presented his experience monitoring indoor air quality during the 2015 wildfire season, and Dr. Shelly Miller from the University of Colorado shared her...

Person: Ray, Miller
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The increasing frequency and intensity of wildland and wildland-urban interface (WUI) fires have become a significant concern in many parts of the United States and around the world. To address and manage this WUI fire risk, local fire departments...

Person: Haynes, Madsen
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

“Student of Fire.” What does this term really mean? Travis Dotson explores what Paul Gleason might have intended when Gleason coined this term. In doing so, Travis challenges us to reflect and improve in all of our endeavors and provides us tips on how...

Person:
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wilderness medicine is the practice of providing medical attention when definitive care is further that 1 hour's travel time to provide medical treatment. In very remote locations, it can take days or weeks for rescuers to reach victims. The...

Person: Alexander
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES