Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Felling your backyard tree could be fatal - logging is one of the five most dangerous jobs in the world - and this broadcast discusses the cause of injuries and how to prevent them.

Person:
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Recent growth in the frequency and severity of US wildfires has led to more wildfire smoke and increased public exposure to harmful air pollutants. Populations exposed to wildfire smoke experience a variety of negative health impacts, imposing economic...

Person: Jones, Berrens
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildland fire fighting is a high-risk occupation requiring considerable physical and psychological demands. Multiple agencies publish fatality summaries for wildland firefighters; however, the reported number and types vary. At least five different...

Person: Butler, Marsh, Domitrovich, Helmkamp
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Simplistically, a High Reliability Organization (HRO) is one that consistently produces the results in a dynamic, often unpredictable environment in which the consequences of errors are catastrophic. Accordingly, the error rate...

Person: Black, Sutcliffe, Barton, Dether
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Exposure to smoke emitted from wildfire and planned burns (i.e., smoke events) has been associated with numerous negative health outcomes, including respiratory symptoms and conditions. This rapid review investigates recent evidence (post-2009)...

Person: Fish, Peters, Ramsey, Sharplin, Corsini, Eckert
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Kris Ray from the Air Quality Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation presented his experience monitoring indoor air quality during the 2015 wildfire season, and Dr. Shelly Miller from the University of Colorado shared her...

Person: Ray, Miller
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The increasing frequency and intensity of wildland and wildland-urban interface (WUI) fires have become a significant concern in many parts of the United States and around the world. To address and manage this WUI fire risk, local fire departments...

Person: Haynes, Madsen
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Creating a safe workplace for wildland firefighters has long been at the centre of discussion for researchers and practitioners. The goal of wildland fire safety research has been to protect operational firefighters, yet its contributions often fall...

Person: Adams, Butler, Brown, Wright, Black
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Remaining inside fire-safe structures or at designated safety zones to actively defend against wildland fire events is an underrepresented area of scholarship. Although research on chemical spills and tornadoes has long advocated a similar practice of...

Person: Paveglio, Carroll, Jakes
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Wilderness medicine is the practice of providing medical attention when definitive care is further that 1 hour's travel time to provide medical treatment. In very remote locations, it can take days or weeks for rescuers to reach victims. The...

Person: Alexander
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES