Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 17

Wildland fire fighting is a high-risk occupation requiring considerable physical and psychological demands. Multiple agencies publish fatality summaries for wildland firefighters; however, the reported number and types vary. At least five different...

Person: Butler, Marsh, Domitrovich, Helmkamp
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'The most important facet of any talk on High Reliability Organizing is immediately establishing the rationale for why busy wildland fire managers, who are already overloaded with firefighting safety issues and decisionmaking...

Person: Thomas
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The increasing incidence, extent and severity of uncontrolled burning globally, together with its many adverse consequences, has brought fire into the international environmental policy arena, with growing calls for international action leading to...

Person: Goldammer
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Galley, Klinger, Sugihara, Hesseln, Rideout
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Prescribed fire is generally considered a useful tool in ecosystem restoration and hazardous fuels reduction. There are many variables associated with the decision process and level of control managers can assert over prescribed burning (e.g., risk,...

Person: Kolden, Brown
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Millions of acres are burned each year by wildland fires, in spite of much effort going into fuel treatments, prevention, and fire suppression. An array of effective decision-support products, tools, and processes is needed to anticipate regional...

Person: Garfin, Wordell, Brown, Ochoa, Morehouse
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

FXNet is the latest technology Incident Meteorologists (IMETS) have at their disposal to collect meteorological data while onsite at wildland fires. During the fire season of 2002 FXNet was used in select areas to test the equipment and get the IMET...

Person: Nester, Vanbussem
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The National Weather Service (NWS) has been a major contributor to the success of the U.S. Wildfire Program for over 67 years. During that time, Incident Meteorologists, (IMET's) have delivered predictive services that have allowed Incident...

Person: Querciagrossa-Sand, Stutler, Goldwater, Bennett
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This talk describes development of a physics-based mathematical and computational model to predict fire spread among structures and natural fuels (trees, shrubs and ground litter). This tool will be used to understand how fires spread in a community...

Person: Rehm, Evans, McGrattan, Forney, Bouldin, Baker, Mell, Hostikka
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Reliable forecasting of regional weather and wind flow patterns is critical for effective fighting of wildland fires and operational management of prescribed burns. Accurate forecast of future wind fields, relative humidity, and stability are essential...

Person: Nikolov, Zeller
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS