Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Sediment cores from Pyramid Lake, an alpine tarn in the Cassiar Mountains of northwestern British Columbia, were investigated for changes in pollen, plant macro-fossils, charcoal, and clastic sediment, which are used to infer changes in climate...

Person: Mazzucchi, Spooner, Gilbert, Osborn
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

While many wetlands form along floodplains of rivers, streams, lakes, and estuaries, others have developed in depressions far removed from such waters. Depressional wetlands completely surrounded by upland have traditionally been called 'isolated...

Person: Tiner
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Miller, Luce, Benda
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the Conclusion ... 'A comprehensive, mechanistic simulation of wildland fire and ecosystem dynamics across a landscape may not be possible because of computer limitations, inadequate research, inconsistent data, and extensive parameterization...

Person: Veblen, Baker, Montenegro, Swetnam, Keane, Finney
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Southwestern canyon woodlands, for purposes of this paper, are vegetation types along canyon bottoms for mostly third and fourth order drainages whose streams may be permanent or intermittent. These include habitat types within blue spruce, white fir,...

Person: Stokes, Dieterich, Moir
Year: 1980
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Despite growing evidence for environmental oscillations during the last glacial-interglacial transition from high latitude, terrestrial sites of the North Pacific rim, oxygen-isotopic records of these oscillations remain sparse. The lack of data is due...

Person: Hu, Shemesh
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

High-resolution analyses of lake sediment from southwestern Alaska reveal cyclic variations in climate and ecosystems during the Holocene. These variations occurred with periodicities similar to those of solar activity and appear to be coherent with...

Person: Hu, Kaufman, Yoneji, Nelson, Shemesh, Huang, Tian, Bond, Clegg, Brown
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Information on amphibian responses to fire and fuel reduction practices is critically needed due to potential declines of species and the prevalence of new, more intensive fire management practices in North American forests. The goals of this review...

Person: Pilliod, Bury, Hyde, Pearl, Corn
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

A landscape-scale prescribed research burn in the boreal forest of interior Alaska, FROSTFIRE, was an unmitigated success for scientists and fire managers. Planning over a 5-year period culminated in a safe and successful burn during 8-15 July 1999....

Person: Galley, Klinger, Sugihara, Sandberg, Chapin, Hinzman
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS