Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

In the eastern boreal forest of Quebec, Canada, harvesting strategies try to mimic the effects of fire on forest ecosystems, assuming that both disturbances have similar impacts. However impacts of both types of perturbations on lacustrine ecosystems,...

Person: Tremblay, Larocque-Tobler, Sirois
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Recent developments in the monitoring of soil degradation processes have used passive remote sensing (diffuse reflectance spectroscopy) and active remote-sensing tools such as ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and frequency domain electromagnetic...

Person: Goldshleger, Ben-Dor, Lugassi, Eshel
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text:'The peat in many parts of Britain is being severly eroded by subaerial forces, but the fire provides a method of erosion not previously emphasized. It removes whole tracts of peat and plant cover in a matter of days and permits...

Person: Radley
Year: 1965
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Brown
Year: 1980
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Southwestern canyon woodlands, for purposes of this paper, are vegetation types along canyon bottoms for mostly third and fourth order drainages whose streams may be permanent or intermittent. These include habitat types within blue spruce, white fir,...

Person: Stokes, Dieterich, Moir
Year: 1980
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In many arid zones around the word, the vegetation spontaneously forms regular patterns to optimize the use of the scarce water resources. The patterns act as early warning signal that fragile ecosystems may suddenly undergo irreversible shifts, thus,...

Person: Ursino, Rulli
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Just over 50 years ago, predicting soil erosion was a time-consuming manual process. These methods have evolved over time and now include models such as the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP), which helps simulate the important physical processes...

Person: Renschler
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

There have been numerous studies worldwide demonstrating that changes in forest density can cause a change in water yield. Bosch and Hewlett (1982), Hibbert (1967), Stednick (1996) and Troendle and Leaf (1980) have summarized the findings from most of...

Person: Elliot, Miller, Audin, Troendle, MacDonald, Luce, Larsen
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This chapter presents a synthesis of current computer modeling tools that are, or could be, adopted for use in evaluating the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management. The chapter focuses on runoff, soil erosion and slope stability predictive...

Person: Elliot, Miller, Audin, Elliot, Hyde, MacDonald, McKean
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The long term fire history at the treeline in Northern Quebec can be evaluated by ecological surveys of the major ecosystems. Available data suggest that fires are presently climate-controlled, and therefore may be used as paleoclimatic indicators....

Person: Stokes, Dieterich, Payette
Year: 1980
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS