Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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[no description entered]

Person: Gom, Rood
Year: 1999
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Cameron, Morrison, Baldwin, Kreutzweiser
Year: 1999
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text:'The peat in many parts of Britain is being severly eroded by subaerial forces, but the fire provides a method of erosion not previously emphasized. It removes whole tracts of peat and plant cover in a matter of days and permits...

Person: Radley
Year: 1965
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The forest floor affects the hydrological cycle, herbage production, tree regeneration, and fire behavior. Forest floor depths and weights under ponderosa pine stands on soils developed from sedimentary parent materials were similar to those previously...

Person: Ffolliott, Clary, Baker
Year: 1976
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire access usually should be via ridges, where soil tends to be shallow, erosion hazards minimal, and timber cover most open. Dry slopes with deep permafrost or none are useable, but any slope is a potential erosion hazard. Permafrost areas, muskegs,...

Person: Helmers
Year: 1976
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The Kink fire started June 12, 1999 and burned 92,010 acres before it was declared out September 13 (Map 1). The primary vegetation was black and white spruce with aspen patches on drier south-facing slopes and scattered birch poplar. Rehabilitation...

Person: Jandt
Year: 1999
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Synthesis of the literature suggests that physical, chemical, and biological elements of a watershed interact with long-term climate to influence fire regime, and that these factors, in concordance with the postfire vegetation mosaic, combine with...

Person: Gresswell
Year: 1999
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS