Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Functionality has been incorporated into the Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool (AGWA) to assess the impacts of wildland fire on runoff and erosion. AGWA (...

Person: Latimer, Trettin, Bosch, Lane, Guertin, Goodrich, Burns, Sheppard, Patel, Clifford, Unkrich, Kepner, Levick
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

It is well established in the world’s fire-prone regions that wildfires can considerably change the hydrological dynamics of freshwater catchments. Limited research, however, has focused on the potential impacts of wildfire ash toxicity on aquatic...

Person: Harper, Santín, Doerr, Froyd, Albini, Otero, Viñas, Pérez-Fernández
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This short paper provides the framework and introduction to this special issue of International Journal of Wildland Fire. Its eight papers were selected from those presented at two consecutive conferences held in 2018 in Europe and the USA that...

Person: Rhoades, Nunes, Silins, Doerr
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fire characteristics, such as area burned, number of large fires, burn intensity, and fire season duration, have increased steadily over the past 30 years, resulting in substantial increases in the costs of suppressing fires and managing...

Person: Steblein, Miller
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires can abruptly transform forests, char vegetation and soils, and create an environment susceptible to postfire erosion and runoff to nearby surface waters serving as potable water supplies. The rising trend in wildfire activity increases the...

Person: Hohner, Summers, Rosario-Ortiz
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires are a natural part of most forest ecosystems, but due to changing climatic and environmental conditions, they have become larger, more severe, and potentially more damaging. Forested watersheds vulnerable to wildfire serve as drinking water...

Person: Hohner, Rhoades, Wilkerson, Rosario-Ortiz
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Rapid climate change at high latitudes is projected to increase wildfire extent in tundra ecosystems by up to five‐fold by the end of the century. Tundra wildfire could alter terrestrial silica (SiO2) cycling by restructuring surface vegetation and by...

Person: Carey, Abbott, Rocha
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The purpose of this document is to outline the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) wildland fire priorities and coordinate the EPA Office of Research and Development’s (ORD’s) wildland-fire-related research across multiple National Research...

Person: Vette, Hagler, Baxter, Cascio, Baghdikian
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

From the text:'The peat in many parts of Britain is being severly eroded by subaerial forces, but the fire provides a method of erosion not previously emphasized. It removes whole tracts of peat and plant cover in a matter of days and permits...

Person: Radley
Year: 1965
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Chapman
Year: 1974
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS