Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Forests protect water quality by reducing soil erosion, sedimentation, and pollution; yet there is little information about the economic value of conserving forests for water quality protection in much of the United States. To assess this value, we...

Person: Kreye, Adams, Escobedo
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fires are the major natural disturbance in the boreal forest, and their frequency and intensity will likely increase as the climate warms. Terrestrial nutrients released by fires may be transported to boreal lakes, stimulating increased primary...

Person: Lewis, Lindberg, Schmutz, Bertram
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Dynamic soil water repellency is a pending challenge in water repellency research. The dynamic change or temporal dependence of repellency is commonly expressed as the persistence of repellency. Persistence, or dynamic changes in contact angle, are...

Person: Beatty, Smith
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text:'The peat in many parts of Britain is being severly eroded by subaerial forces, but the fire provides a method of erosion not previously emphasized. It removes whole tracts of peat and plant cover in a matter of days and permits...

Person: Radley
Year: 1965
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Chapman
Year: 1974
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Schmiege, Helmers, Bishop
Year: 1974
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This review summarizes the available literature relevant to British Columbia concerning the influences of harvesting and post-harvest practices upon the forest environment and resources, and points out significant gaps in knowledge where research would...

Person: Bell, Beckett, Hubbard
Year: 1974
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The Western Arctic Caribou Herd (WACH) has increased dramatically in size over the last forty years, from approximately 75,000 animals in 1970 to 490,000 in 2003, and is now estimated at approximately 348,000 (Dau 2005, Joly et al. 2006). With the...

Person: Fulkerson, Carlson
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

We examined the water balance of a forested ombrotrophic peatland and adjacent burned peatland in the boreal plain of western Canada over a 3-year period. Complete combustion of foliage and fine branches dramatically increased shortwave radiation...

Person: Thompson, Benscoter, Waddington
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

[From description] Earth is the only planet known to have fire. The reason is both simple and profound: fire exists because Earth is the only planet to possess life as we know it. Fire is an expression of life on Earth and an index of life's...

Person: Scott, Bowman, Bond, Pyne, Alexander
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES