Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Erosion from fire-damaged wildlands poses a significant water quality concern. Deprived of vegetation, runoff intensifies, which escalates exports of sediments and other pollutants. Used as mulches, composts shield the soil surface and reduce runoff by...

Person: Crohn, Chaganti, Reddy
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire can cause substantial changes to runoff, erosion and downstream sediment delivery processes. In response to these disturbance effects, the main sources of sediment transported within burned catchments may also change. Sediment tracing offers...

Person: Smith, Blake, Owens
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The diversity of ecosystems across boreal landscapes, successional changes after disturbance and complicated permafrost histories, present enormous challenges for assessing how vegetation, water and soil carbon may respond to climate change in boreal...

Person: Jorgenson, Harden, Kanevskiy, O'Donnell , Wickland, Ewing, Manies, Zhuang, Shur, Striegl, Koch
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text:'The peat in many parts of Britain is being severly eroded by subaerial forces, but the fire provides a method of erosion not previously emphasized. It removes whole tracts of peat and plant cover in a matter of days and permits...

Person: Radley
Year: 1965
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Harper
Year: 1939
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Bell
Year: 1935
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire is ubiquitous to interior Alaska and is the primary large-scale disturbance regime affecting thawing permafrost and ecosystem processes in boreal forests. Since surface and near surface hydrology is strongly affected by permafrost occurrence,...

Person: Altmann
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Post-wildfire science is generally not recognized as a discipline in its own right, so the intention of this Chapman Conference is to bring together experts from the field of post-wildfire research, the meteorological and hydrological modeling field,...

Person: Moody, Martin
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Production, transport, and degradation of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (DOM) influence carbon (C) and nutrient cycling in both soils and downstream aquatic ecosystems. Here, we assessed the impacts of wildfire on DOM production, composition,...

Person: Blodau, Olefeldt, Turetsky
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Climate change (CC) is projected to increase the frequency and severity of natural disturbances (wildfires, insect outbreaks, and debris flows) and shift distributions of terrestrial ecosystems on a global basis. Although such terrestrial changes may...

Person: Davis, Baxter, Rosi-Marshall, Pierce, Crosby
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES