Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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From the text:'The peat in many parts of Britain is being severly eroded by subaerial forces, but the fire provides a method of erosion not previously emphasized. It removes whole tracts of peat and plant cover in a matter of days and permits...

Person: Radley
Year: 1965
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

'...That man contributed (and continues to contribute) to the incidence of fires on the Great Plains cannot be denied, but the role of lightning should not be overlooked or slighted.'

Person: Granfelt
Year: 1965
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The author reemphasizes the intimate relationship between forest protection and timber growing. He points out that protection should not be divorced functionally or administratively from the overall job of forest management© Society of American...

Person: Brown
Year: 1947
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Pinchot
Year: 1947
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'In this particular paper, as a fire ecologist, I am not primarily interested in the economic use of fire for man, but rather in the ecological relations of fire to plants, animals, and man in those interesting and sometimes...

Person: Komarek
Year: 1965
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Van Wagner
Year: 1965
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Basal scarring, a conspicuous abnormality of western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl.) and its associated species in the Interior region of British Columbia, was found to be chiefly attributable to injury by bears, infections of Armillaria mellea (...

Person: Molnar, McMinn
Year: 1960
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Notes on page 162 at Lake Tagish in the Yukon Territory Indian burning for signaling in 1889.

Person: Chase
Year: 1947
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES