Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Canopy and surface fuels in many fire-prone forests of the United States have increased over the last 70 years as a result of modern fire exclusion policies, grazing, and other land management activities. The Healthy Forest Restoration Act and National...

Person: Keane, Rollins, Zhu
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildland fire is a significant disturbance in many ecosystems worldwide and the interaction of fire with climate and vegetation over long time spans has major effects on vegetation dynamics, ecosystem carbon budgets, and patterns of biodiversity....

Person: Cary, Keane, Flannigan
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Silvicultural cutting treatments may be needed to restore whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests, but little is known of the response of this species to removal of competition through prescribed burning or silvicultural cuttings. We analyzed stem...

Person: Keane, Gray, Dickinson
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

We assessed accuracy in point fire intervals using a simulation model that sampled four spatially explicit simulated fire histories. These histories varied in fire frequency and size and were simulated on a flat landscape with two forest types (dry...

Person: Parsons, Heyerdahl, Keane, Dorner, Fall
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Canopy and surface fuels in many fire-prone forests of the United States have increased over the last 70 years as a result of modern fire exclusion policies, grazing, and other land management activities. The Healthy Forest Restoration Act and National...

Person: Keane, Rollins, Zhu
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

We present a decision support application that evaluates danger of severe wildland fire and prioritizes subwatersheds for vegetation and fuels treatment. We demonstrate the use of the system with an example from the Rocky Mountain region in the State...

Person: Hessburg, Reynolds, Keane, James, Salter
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Wildland fire is a major disturbance in most ecosystems worldwide (Crutzen and Goldammer 1993). The interaction of fire with climate and vegetation over long time spans, often referred to as the fire regime (Agee 1993; Clark 1993; Swetnam and Baisan...

Person: Canadell, Pataki, Pitelka, Keane, Cary, Davies, Flannigan, Gardner, Lavorel, Lenihan, Li, Rupp
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES