Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Year

Person

Displaying 1 - 10 of 35

The combination of a gutted B.C. Forest Service, vast areas of not sufficiently restocked forest lands, a quirky loophole in the Kyoto Protocol and a provincial government ideologically driven to sell off public assets has created the perfect...

Person: Penn
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A synthesis was carried out to analyze information available to quantify fire activity and burned area across North America, including a comparison of different data sources and an assessment of how variations in burned area estimate impact carbon...

Person: Kasischke, Loboda, Giglio, French, Hoy, de Jong, Riano
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Large fire years in which >1% of the landscape burns are becoming more frequent in the Alaskan (USA) interior, with four large fire years in the past 10 years, and 79 000 km2 (17% of the region) burned since 2000. We modeled fire severity conditions...

Person: Barrett, McGuire, Hoy, Kasischke
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Climate warming and drying are modifying the fire dynamics of many boreal forests, moving them towards a regime with a higher frequency of extreme fire years characterized by large burns of high severity. Plot-scale studies indicate that increased burn...

Person: Beck, Goetz, Mack, Alexander, Jin, Randerson, Loranty
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire frequency is expected to increase due to climate warming in many areas, particularly the boreal forests. An increase in fire frequency may have important effects on the global carbon cycle by decreasing the size of boreal carbon stores. Our...

Person: Brown, Johnstone
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

To assess ongoing changes in high latitude vegetation productivity we compared spatiotemporal patterns in remotely sensed vegetation productivity in the tundra and boreal zones of North America and Eurasia. We compared the long-term GIMMS (Global...

Person: Beck, Goetz
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Increasing private wildfire risk mitigation is an important part of the larger forest restoration policy challenge. Data from an economic experiment are used to evaluate the effectiveness of providing fuel reductions on public land adjacent to private...

Person: Prante, Little, Jones, McKee, Berrens
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Ecosystems driven by wildfire regimes are characterized by fire size distributions resembling power laws. Existing models produce power laws, but their predicted exponents are too high and fail to capture the exponent's variation with geographic...

Person: Zinck, Pascual, Grimm
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Boreal ecosystems store 10-20% of global soil carbon and may warm by 4-7ºC over the next century. Higher temperatures could increase the activity of boreal decomposers and indirectly affect decomposition through other ecosystem feedbacks. For example,...

Person: Allison, Treseder
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Rangeland extent is an important factor for evaluating critical indicators of rangeland sustainability. Rangeland areal extent was determined for the coterminous United States in a geospatial framework by evaluating spatially explicit data from the...

Person: Reeves, Mitchell
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS