Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Year

Person

Displaying 1 - 10 of 34

Soil temperature and moisture are important factors that control many ecosystem processes. However, interactions between soil thermal and hydrological processes are not adequately understood in cold regions, where the frozen soil, fire disturbance, and...

Person: Yi, McGuire, Harden, Kasischke, Manies, Hinzman, Liljedahl, Randerson, Liu, Romanovsky, Marchenko, Kim
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The retrieval of Live Fuel Moisture Content (LFMC) over fire prone grasslands is important for fire risk and drought assessment. Radiative transfer (RT) model based inversion of measured reflectances for retrievals of LFMC offers a promising method for...

Person: Dasgupta, Qu, Bhoi
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper explores whether fundamental differences exist between urban and rural vulnerability to climate-induced changes in the fire regime of interior Alaska. We further examine how communities and fire managers have responded to these changes and...

Person: Trainor, Calef, Natcher, Chapin, McGuire, Huntington, Duffy, Rupp, DeWilde, Kwart, Fresco, Lovecraft
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Because fire was such an important historic disturbance and is a large component in understanding regional differences in emissions, it is analogous to an elephant in the closet. One can think of fire frequency as the elephant....

Person: Robertson, Galley, Masters, Guyette, Stambaugh
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Literature shows that at a global scale, fire activity increased from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present. There is incremental evidence indicating that climate defines the regional boundary conditions for fire. Human influence on ignitions depends...

Person: Dube
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We used the TELSA forest landscape model to examine the long-term consequences of applying different forest management scenarios on indicators of wildlife habitat, understory productivity, crown fuel hazard, timber yield and treatment costs. The study...

Person: Klenner, Walton
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Understanding and being able to predict forest fire occurrence, fire growth and fire intensity are important aspects of forest fire management. In Canada fire management agencies use the Canadian Forest Fire Danger Rating System (CFFDRS) to help...

Person: Wotton
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Natural fires annually decimate up to 1% of the forested area in the boreal region of Quebec, and represent a major structuring force in the region, creating a mosaic of watersheds characterized by large variations in vegetation structure and...

Person: Marchand, Prairie, Del Giorgio
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Burning crop residue before and/or after harvest is a common farming practice however; there is no baseline estimate for cropland burned area in the contiguous U.S. (CONUS). We present the results of a study, using five years of remotely sensed...

Person: McCarty, Korontzi, Justice, Loboda
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Yield curves are traditionally constructed with mean age of dominant trees as the temporal variable. However. When tree longevity is shorter than the average period of time between two successive disturbances. Mean age of dominant trees becomes a...

Person: Garet, Pothier, Bouchard
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS