Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 35

[1] Large lightning wildfires in Canada and Alaska account for most of the area burnt and are main determiners of the age mosaic of the landscape. Such fires occur when positive midtroposphere height anomalies persist > 10 days during the fire...

Person: Fauria, Johnson
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We deployed a mesonet of year-round eddy covariance towers in boreal forest stands that last burned in ~1850, ~1930, 1964, 1981, 1989, 1998, and 2003 to understand how CO2 exchange and evapotranspiration change during secondary succession. We used...

Person: Goulden, Winston, McMillan, Litvak, Read, Rocha, Elliot
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Savannas are a major terrestrial biome, comprising of grasses with the C4 photosynthetic pathway and trees with the C3 type. This mixed grass-tree biome rapidly appeared on the ecological stage 8 million years ago with the near-synchronous expansion of...

Person: Beerling, Osborne
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Post-fire nutrient flushes are an important precursor to secondary succession in fire-driven boreal forest. We studied the magnitude of changes in post-fire soil nutrient status across a chronosequence of ericaceous shrub-dominated boreal forest stands...

Person: Bloom, Mallik
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Boreal forests are highly susceptible to wildfire, and post-fire changes in soil temperature and moisture have the potential to transform large areas of the landscape from a net sink to a net source of carbon (C). Understanding the ecological controls...

Person: O'Neill, Richter, Kasischke
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Forest fires are among the most important natural disturbances in the boreal region, but fire-initiated succession is increasingly often interrupted by salvage logging, i.e., post-fire removal of burned trees. Unfortunately, very little is known about...

Person: Koivula, Cobb, Dechene, Jacobs, Spence
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire can lead to considerable hydrological and geomorphological change, both directly by weathering bedrock surfaces and changing soil structure and properties, and indirectly through the effects of changes to the soil and vegetation on...

Person: Shakesby, Doerr
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The past decade has seen an increasing interest in forest management based on historical or natural disturbance dynamics. The rationale is that management that favours landscape compositions and stand structures similar to those found historically...

Person: Bergeron, Cyr, Drever, Flannigan, Gauthier, Kneeshaw, Lauzon, Leduc, Le Goff, Lesieur, Logan
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Guyette, Stambaugh, Muzika, McMurry
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Nazzaro
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS