Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Black carbon (BC) aerosol emitted by boreal fires has the potential to accelerate losses of snow and ice in many areas of the Arctic, yet the importance of this source relative to fossil fuel BC emissions from lower latitudes remains uncertain. Here we...

Person: Mouteva, Czimczik, Fahrni, Wiggins, Rogers, Veraverbeke, Xu, Santos, Henderson, Miller, Randerson
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Resistance to the use of prescribed fire is strong among many private land managers despite the advantages it offers for maintaining fire-adapted ecosystems. Even managers who are aware of the benefits of using prescribed fire as a management tool...

Person: Wonkka, Rogers, Kreuter
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Natural resource management in fire-prone systems is increasingly complex. Private and public land managers may seek to achieve a range of outcomes from natural landscapes. In some cases these outcomes, as well as the management approaches used to...

Person: Toman, Brenkert-Smith, Curtis, Rogers, Stidham
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Boreal fires burn into carbon-rich organic soils, thereby releasing large quantities of trace gases and aerosols that influence atmospheric composition and climate. To better understand the factors regulating boreal fire emissions, we developed a...

Person: Veraverbeke, Rogers, Randerson
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Wildfires are common in boreal forests around the globe and strongly influence ecosystem processes. However, North American forests support more high-intensity crown fires than Eurasia, where lower-intensity surface fires are common. These two types of...

Person: Rogers, Soja, Goulden, Randerson
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The degree and manner in which different fires affect climate is a complete unknown, but is expected to vary substantially and may in fact represent a currently untapped climate mitigation service. In this webinar, Rogers will provide background on...

Person: Rogers
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES