Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 310

A recent study of simulated forecast-based interventions as a tool to reduce the health and economic burden during smoke episodes. The study illustrated a large health burden associated with these events and the potential benefit an adaptation of...

Person: Rappold
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Fires impact atmospheric composition through their emissions, which range from long-lived gases to short-lived gases and aerosols. Effects are typically larger in the tropics and boreal regions but can also be substantial in highly populated areas in...

Person: Voulgarakis, Field
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Two different storms started the Black Hills and Fish Lakes Fires on the Tetlin NWR. The Black Hills fire was started by lightning on July 16th. The Fish Lake Fire was first sighted on July 29th, probably resulting from lighting on July 21st. These two...

Person: Kwart, Henderson, Butteri, Paintner, Sorbel
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This guide is intended as a reference for US users who may have reason to work with the system in the United States, where English units are primarily used. Keep in mind that the Canadian Forest Service has produced the definitive selection of...

Person: Ziel
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Robert "Zeke" Ziel, a long-term analyst and fire behavior specialist for the State of Alaska, Zeke gives an overview of the past and current tools used in Alaska (and elsewhere) for Landscape Risk Assessment and exposure to wildfire. Modeling is more...

Person: Ziel
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Increased use of prescribed fire by land managers and the increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change require an improved modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This issue is addressed here by developing and testing...

Person: Massman
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Based primarily on the Canadian Forest Fire Danger Rating System (CFFDRS) component parts, the Fire Weather Index (FWI) System and the Fire Behavior Prediction (FBP) System, this document can be used to guide learning users through the fire behavior...

Person: Ziel
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

1. Phylogenies are increasingly incorporated into ecological studies on the basis that evolutionary relatedness broadly correlates with trait similarity. However, phylogenetic approaches have rarely been applied to monitoring long-term community change...

Person: Larkin, Hipp, Kattge, Prescott, Tonietto, Jacobi, Bowles
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Smoke can be transported hundreds of miles downwind by prevailing winds or convective winds generated by fires themselves with concentrations sufficient to make it the most significant source of air pollution over large areas....

Person: Val Martin, Pierce, Heald
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'By carefully integrating modeling and simulation into their decision-making, managers can better size equipment capabilities, fine-tune complex resource decisions (across any planning time horizon), and maximize the usefulness...

Person: Peterson, Davis, Eckhause, Pouy, Sigalas-Markham, Volovoi
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS