Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Preliminary list of fire research needs in Alaska.

Person: Barnes
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

[From lead-in] Although there are many other fire behavior knowledge gaps and research needs that I could list here (e.g., development of models or guidelines for predicting fire vortex generation, plume-dominated or convectively dominated fires and...

Person: Alexander
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

As fire managers we are responsible for providing the public with the most cost efficient system of fire protection and management. We are tasked with using personnel and equipment at their most efficient and safe level. To obtain these levels of...

Person: Howard
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wilderness fire science has progressed since the last major review of the topic, but it was significantly affected by the large fire events of 1988. Strides have been made in both fire behavior and fire effects, and in the issues of scaling, yet much...

Person: Cole, McCool, Borrie, O'Loughlin, Agee
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The following list of fire research topics and questions were generated by personnel from agencies and organizations within AWFCG during 2010 Fall Fire Review and through other solicitations. The topics were initially ranked by the AWFCG Fire Research...

Person:
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In the boreal forests of interior Alaska, feedbacks that link forest soils, fire characteristics, and plant traits have supported stable cycles of forest succession for the past 6000 years. This high resilience of forest stands to fire disturbance is...

Person: Johnstone, Chapin, Hollingsworth, Mack, Romanovsky, Turetsky
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Spotting ignition by lofted firebrands is a significant mechanism of fire spread, as observed in many large-scale fires. The role of firebrands in fire propagation and the important parameters involved in spot fire development are studied. Historical...

Person: Koo, Pagni, Weise, Woycheese
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Extreme weather often contributes to crown fires, where the fire spreads from one tree crown to the next as a series of piloted ignitions. An important aspect in predicting crown fires is understanding the ignition of fuel particles. The ignition...

Person: McAllister, Finney, Cohen
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire managers are now realizing that wildfires can be beneficial because they can reduce hazardous fuels and restore fire-dominated ecosystems. A software tool that assesses potential beneficial and detrimental ecological effects from wildfire would be...

Person: Keane, Karau
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Existing records show that five wildfires burned more than 1,600 hectares of tundra on Alaska's Arctic Slope. Environmental conditions suitable for lightning, ignition, and burning occur more often than previously recognized at this northern...

Person: Barney, Comiskey
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES