Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Year

Person

Displaying 1 - 10 of 26

At the request of public and private wildland fire managers who recognized a need to assimilate current fire effects knowledge, we produced this state-of-the-art integrated series of documents relevant to management of ecosystems. The series covers our...

Person: Brown, Smith, Brown
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

[From lead-in] Although there are many other fire behavior knowledge gaps and research needs that I could list here (e.g., development of models or guidelines for predicting fire vortex generation, plume-dominated or convectively dominated fires and...

Person: Alexander
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

As fire managers we are responsible for providing the public with the most cost efficient system of fire protection and management. We are tasked with using personnel and equipment at their most efficient and safe level. To obtain these levels of...

Person: Howard
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A method is presented for the evaluation of the heating efficiency required for ignition as a spreading fire closes with fuel. An array of thermocouples was implanted in the fuel ahead of the fire to obtain the heat absorbed by the fuel prior to...

Person: Frandsen
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Wilderness fire science has progressed since the last major review of the topic, but it was significantly affected by the large fire events of 1988. Strides have been made in both fire behavior and fire effects, and in the issues of scaling, yet much...

Person: Cole, McCool, Borrie, O'Loughlin, Agee
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The year 1999 marks the 50th anniversary of the Mann Gulch Fire that occurred in western Montana on August 5, 1949 (Matthews 1999). There has been considerable interest amongst the Canadian wildland fire community in the 1949 Mann Gulch Fire ever...

Person: Alexander
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The scientific literature on logging after wildfire is reviewed, with a focus on environ-mental effects of logging and removal of large woody structure. Rehabilitation, the practice of planting or seeding after logging, is not reviewed here. Several...

Person: McIver, Starr
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Existing records show that five wildfires burned more than 1,600 hectares of tundra on Alaska's Arctic Slope. Environmental conditions suitable for lightning, ignition, and burning occur more often than previously recognized at this northern...

Person: Barney, Comiskey
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

An important challenge in global-change research is to stimulate short-term transient changes in climate, disturbance regime, and recruitment that drive long-term vegetation distributions. Spatial features (e.g., topographic barriers) and processes,...

Person: Rupp, Starfield, Chapin
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Our study objective was to develop a better understanding of the ecological significance of unburned forest remnants in successional sub-boreal landscapes created by fire. We characterized remnant forest patches and compared them to matrix forest in...

Person: DeLong, Kessler
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS