Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Wilderness fire science has progressed since the last major review of the topic, but it was significantly affected by the large fire events of 1988. Strides have been made in both fire behavior and fire effects, and in the issues of scaling, yet much...

Person: Cole, McCool, Borrie, O'Loughlin, Agee
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Large, infrequent fires (LIFs) can have substantial impacts on both ecosystems and the economy. To better understand LIFs and to better predict the effects of human management and climate change on their occurrence, we must first determine the factors...

Person: Meyn, White, Buhk, Jentsch
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The research and development (R&D) arm of the Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), with approximately 550 researchers in a range of biological, physical, and social science fields, seeks to better understand and describe the...

Person:
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire scientists in the United States began exploring the relationships of fire-danger and hazard with weather, fuel moisture, and ignition probabilities as early as 1916. Many of the relationships identified then persist today in the form of our...

Person: Hardy, Hardy
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Cross-scale spatial and temporal perspectives are important for studying contagious landscape disturbances such as fire, which are controlled by myriad processes operating at different scales. We examine fire regimes in forests of western North America...

Person: Falk, Miller, McKenzie, Black
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Millennial-scale records of forest fire provide important baseline information for ecosystem management, especially in regions with too few recent fires to describe the historical range of variability. Charcoal records from lake sediments and soil...

Person: Gavin, Hallett, Hu, Lertzman, Prichard, Brown, Lynch, Bartlein, Peterson
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

This chapter presents a broader, more fundamental view of the ecological principles and shifting fire regimes described in the previous chapters that have important implications for ecosystem management. Also included are strategies and approaches for...

Person: Brown, Smith, Brown
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

This state-of-knowledge review about the effects of fire on flora and fuels can assist land managers with ecosystem and fire management planning and in their efforts to inform others about the ecological role of fire. Chapter topics include fire regime...

Person: Brown, Smith, Harrington, Ryan, Patterson, Wilson, Wade, Sackett, Paysen, Narog, Myers, Miller, Hoch, Hawkes, Haase, Gottfried, Grace, Duchesne, Brown, Brose, Brock, Arno, Ansley
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS