Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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It is well understood that the incidence and behavior of forest fire depends mainly on short-term weather influences of no more than several days duration. And yet, all through the history of fire danger rating in the United States and Canada, runs a...

Person: Alexander
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The following list of research topics was generated by agencies within AWFCG during 2005.  The topics were ranked originally by the AWFCG Fire Research and Development Committee (FRDAC) and finally by the AWFCG members.  Ranking was as follows:  3=...

Person: York
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

At the request of public and private wildland fire managers who recognized a need to assimilate current fire effects knowledge, we produced this state-of-the-art integrated series of documents relevant to management of ecosystems. The series covers our...

Person: Brown, Smith, Brown
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Extensive bibliographic list of references on Alaska wildfire from the Geophysical Institute.

Person:
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

C4 photosynthesis had a mid-Tertiary origin that was tied to declining atmospheric CO2, but C4-dominated grasslands did not appear until late Tertiary. According to the 'CO2-threshold' model, these C4 grasslands owe their origin to a further...

Person: Keeley, Rundel
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Landscape fragmentation can affect fuel accumulation, increase the spatial variability of fuel loads, and affect the susceptibility of forests to fire. Fragmentation creates a complex environment in which to manage forests in the United States and...

Person: Gould, González, Hudak
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wilderness fire science has progressed since the last major review of the topic, but it was significantly affected by the large fire events of 1988. Strides have been made in both fire behavior and fire effects, and in the issues of scaling, yet much...

Person: Cole, McCool, Borrie, O'Loughlin, Agee
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The extraordinary intellectual achievement of the 19th century German botanist Andreas Schimper was his book Plant-Geography upon a Physiological Basis (Schimper, 1903). Through sheer force of imagination and by drawing on numerous written observations...

Person: Bowman
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

It is difficult to find references to fire in general textbooks on ecology, conservation biology or biogeography, in spite of the fact that large parts of the world burn on a regular basis, and that there is a considerable literature on the ecology of...

Person: Bond, Keeley
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Nationally, the causes and extent of fire on lands administrated by the United States Forest Service varied significantly from 1940 to 2000, with California experiencing the largest relative annual burned areas. The south-east and California...

Person: Stephens
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS