Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

The 1998 wildland fire season presented conditions favoring increased wildland fire numbers and rapid expansion of area affected. This situation posed complex issues to all wildland fire management agencies in terms of firefighting resource...

Person: Goens, Ferguson, Zimmerman, Hilbruner, Werth, Sexton, Bartlette
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The impact of climate change on human ecology in the northern latitudes is dependent upon the rate, magnitude, and duration of expected change. This paper provides a foundation for understanding these important components by describing elements of the...

Person: Peterson, Johnson, Ferguson
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fires in the northern interior have long been known to smolder for long periods. Because emission rates from smoldering smoke are small in comparison to rates of emissions during flaming, however, and because it is difficult to monitor smoldering fires...

Person: Ferguson
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fine-scale weather data are becoming increasing available for fire weather and fire danger forecasting to support tactical fire preparedness and prescribed fire planning. Unfortunately, appropriate techniques to implement the National Fire Danger...

Person: Hoadley, Bradshaw, Ferguson, Goodrick, Werth, Hostetler
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Lightning causes most wildfires in the western United States, and is a major cause of fire elsewhere in the U.S. Because most lightning occurs with significant precipitation, however, simple predictions of Lightning Activity Level (LAL) do not...

Person: Rorig, Ferguson, Goodrick, Werth
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Description not entered.

Person: Rorig, Ferguson, Sandberg
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The moisture content of material on a forest floor can play a significant role in its potential for fire ignition and resulting severity, especially in boreal ecosystems that contain deep layers of moss. To better understand the effect of weather and...

Person: Ferguson, Rorig, Bluhm, Sandberg
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In managing smoke from wildland biomass fires, much effort has been placed on lofted trajectories that may influence human health, regional haze, scenic vistas, and effects on incoming radiation. It has been found, however, that neutrally-buoyant smoke...

Person: Ferguson, Ruthford, Nagel, Moore, Sandberg
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

With the increasing use of prescribed fire, predicting the potential impacts are becoming more and more important. Of great concern are the effects of smoke on human health and visibility. To help land managers anticipate and plan for potential...

Person: Ferguson
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Ventilation Climate Information System (VCIS) is one of few landscape tools for evaluating and documenting the probability of potential smoke impacts. This project is implementing user-identified improvements to the data and web-access system,...

Person: Hoadley, Ferguson, Larkin
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES