Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Fire frequency is expected to increase due to climate warming in many areas, particularly the boreal forests. An increase in fire frequency may have important effects on the global carbon cycle by decreasing the size of boreal carbon stores. Our...

Person: Brown, Johnstone
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Coarse woody debris serves many functions in forest ecosystem processes and has important implications for fire management as it affects air quality, soil heating and carbon budgets when it combusts. There is relatively little research evaluating the...

Person: Hyde, Smith, Ottmar, Alvarado, Morgan
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Efforts to quantify relationships between climate and wildfire in Alaska have not yet explored the role of higher-frequency meteorological conditions on individual wildfire ignition and growth. To address this gap, meteorological data for 665 large...

Person: Abatzoglou, Kolden
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

[From lead-in] Although there are many other fire behavior knowledge gaps and research needs that I could list here (e.g., development of models or guidelines for predicting fire vortex generation, plume-dominated or convectively dominated fires and...

Person: Alexander
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A major concern of land man­agers in the United States is the response of watersheds to weather after a wildfire. With an ever-expanding wildland-urban interface (WUI), land managers must be cognizant of potential damage to private property and other...

Person: Clark, McKinley
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Alaska lost 10% of its boreal forest area due to vigorous forest fires in 2004 and 2005. Repeated lightningcaused forest fires adversely impact residents and influence earth's atmosphere in every fire season. The authors have reported on the...

Person: Farukh, Hayasaka, Kimura
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Lightning occurred in Alaska an extraordinary number of times 120,000 a year, or 4 times more than average in 2004, 2005, and 2007, starting 500 forest and wild fires. Given the rainless conditions at the time, fires in 2004 and 2005 burned 10% of...

Person: Farukh, Hayasaka, Kimura
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A relation between fire behavior and crown scorch height is derived from measurements on 13 experimental outdoor fires. The range of data includes fire intensities from 16 to 300 kcal/s-m, and scorch heights from 2 to 17 m. The results agree with...

Person: Van Wagner
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

As fire managers we are responsible for providing the public with the most cost efficient system of fire protection and management. We are tasked with using personnel and equipment at their most efficient and safe level. To obtain these levels of...

Person: Howard
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Detailed point weather forecasts are a critical component of fire management planning. Accurate hour-by-hour forecasts for your exact location are valuable when you are preparing to ignite a prescribed burn and want to compare your prescription with...

Person: Long, Oxarart
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS