Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

The soils and vegetation of 12 stages of forest succession on the floodplain of the Tanana River are described. Succession begins with the invasion of newly deposited alluvium by willows (Salix spp.) and develops through a willow-alder (Alnus...

Person: Viereck, Dyrness, Foote
Year: 1993
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This text describes and illustrates the native woody plants in Alaska. From introduction: 'This handbook covers all Alaska from the narrow southestern coastal region along the Pacific Ocean west and southwest through the long chain of the Aleutian...

Person: Viereck, Little
Year: 1972
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This paper provides an overview of the environmental setting, rationale, and organization of a multidisciplinary research programme designed to examine the role of salt-affected soils in primary succession on the Tanana River floodplain of interior...

Person: Van Cleve, Viereck, Marion
Year: 1993
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The taiga of Alaska consists of a vegetation mosaic resulting primarily from past wildfires. Today, both lightning- and man-caused wildfires burn an average of 400,000 hectares annually, creating vast areas of successional ecosystems. However, although...

Person: Viereck
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In the taiga of Alaska, permafrost and vegetation are closely related. In areas underlain by permafrost, the nature of the vegetation is important in determining the thickness of the active layer. In a black spruce stand, the active layer is normally...

Person: Viereck
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES